Topic RSS | Reply to topic
Author Post

AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Fri Apr 18th, 2008 2:49pm Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
Intersting. I'm not sure I'd trust the recording technology of pre-1900 days to capture correctly a man's pitch though. One imagines he probably had to raise his voice quite a bit just to be heard...

Incidentally, I Googled it, and this was the first link that came up: BBC reporting in 2000 that the Wilde recording 'a fake'

The last paragraph of the article:

"Sally Brown, curator of the British Library's A Life In Six Acts exhibition about Wilde said: "This piece is a fascinating curiosity, but it would be wonderful to find a true recording of his voice, described as the texture of brown velvet played like a cello.""

With all respect due to Tim Brooke-Taylor, that hardly sounds like his Lady Constance.

Back to top

Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Fri Apr 18th, 2008 3:02pm Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
Intersting. I'm not sure I'd trust the recording technology of pre-1900 days to capture correctly a man's pitch though. One imagines he probably had to raise his voice quite a bit just to be heard...



yes...it would be pretty "scratchy"... i once found a recording posted online of walt whitman's voice. don't know if it's for real or not ...but it sounded like he was talking with all his lungs, one word clearly hollered at a time...probably not how he would have read a poem to another person, but the only way the recorder could pick it up.

this podcast had me thinking about whitman...this and a recent show about him on pbs. wilde met him on his visit to america and the thought of those two colliding ... makes me happy.

Back to top

AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Fri Apr 18th, 2008 3:29pm Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
Speaking of the hollering in the early records - that's another point for why the recording is fake. It's read quietly, intimately - and yet it got recorded. This would've been impossible before or in 1900, when people still had to speak very loudly for the sound to be picked up by the insensitive membranes. I read a technical analysis of the cylinder, and the conclusion was that it could've been made that early - the technology just wasn't around yet.

I might as well just copy-paste from the site:

The recording as it sounded could not have been made in 1900 for a number of complex technical reasons:

1. The surface noise has a different frequency spectrum from the voice. The noise is bandwidth-limited to an octave or so centred on about 1kHz; the speech extends from about 200Hz to about 3kHz. While the latter is not absolutely impossible, it could only have been reproduced if the accompanying surface-noise had similar characteristics.

2. It is highly unlikely, however, that a frequency range as described above could have been achieved by 1900. In particular, the sibilants, though faint, are true, and do not have the characteristic diaphragm-resonance colouration endemic to all acoustically recorded speech, even Edison "Diamond" discs. Prior to the invention of the acoustically damped diaphragm (in Wente's microphone of 1924) this cleanness of sound could not have been achieved.

3. There is also no sign of horn colouration, though admittedly this could be rendered inaudible by a first-rate machine skilfully operated.

4. The speaker seems to be delivering the lines in too quiet a voice to have been recorded by the acoustic process. In all other surviving examples of acoustically recorded speech the voice is pitched as if the speaker were addressing a large hall full of people. This was essential to overcome the insensitivity of the recording diaphragm. The reciter of The Ballad of Reading Gaol, however, has adopted a very intimate tone by comparison.

5. The character of the surface noise is quite unlike that of other cylinders held by the NSA. It consists of discrete clicks (rather than hiss or swishing), which are characteristic of physical damage such as scratches or mould. There is very little rhythmic element to the sound, implying that such scratches or mould are always less than one groove-width (a hundredth of an inch) in size, because otherwise two or more neighbouring turns would be affected. Yet the clicks are loud, louder than the speech, indicating that the damage or mould is of quite significant dimensions. Also, there is no sign of the increase of noise at the ends of the cylinder which is generally part of such damage.

6. The rotational speed of a cylinder can usually be ascertained by listening to the surface noise. It is not easy to be dogmatic in this case because of the lack of repeated clicks, but the basic tempo indicates a speed well below the 120 rpm then considered standard--in fact, exactly as if someone had used a 78 rpm turntable to generate the clicks.

This analysis of the technical aspects enabled us to get beyond the existing debate and its reliance on memory to the internal evidence that the original recording could not have been a cylinder and could not have been recorded as early as 1900. Oscar Wilde died in that year: it could not be his voice on the recording.

Back to top

reddy-set-go


Member

Posted Mon Apr 21st, 2008 8:56am Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
Number 3 definitely has to be his best yet. I must confess I have never learnt much about Mr Wilde, and after having a week of feeling rather unwell, the podcast did brighten my day somewhat. I hope I didn't wake anyone up here with my giggling.... I listen to Mr Fry's podcast late at night, as I find his voice rather soothing (freqent insomniac).

You do all know about the alarm clock with his voice, I hope?

Back to top

Fryphile


Member *

Posted Mon Apr 21st, 2008 12:56pm Post subject: #3..is there a text version?

You do all know about the alarm clock with his voice, I hope?

Have it. Love it. Don't want to wake up without it.

I think of myself as someone who is filled with love, whose only purpose in life was to achieve love. - Stephen Fry

Back to top

TinaL


Member

Posted Tue Apr 22nd, 2008 4:09pm Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
now I know.. thank you for the link Fryphile... *smile*

I guess I will be in a good mood tomorrow morning

Back to top

Soph


Member

Posted Tue May 26th, 2009 2:00am Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
Wallpaper piccies!








I'm so sorry for bumping this thread! But I was midnight Fry googling, and the discovery of these pictures made me squee like the fangirl I am. Thanks, Fryphile. ;D

Photobucket

Back to top

ginj


Member *

Posted Tue May 26th, 2009 2:57am Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
Oh, I have never seen these before. Thanks for bumping this up. I love the first picture, and in the last one he looks like a school boy (actually I thought of Leave it to Beaver as soon as I looked at it. X-D )

Back to top

Help


Member

Posted Tue May 26th, 2009 9:09am Post subject: #3..is there a text version?

That's my name
I've never seen these before they're all so good!
Thank you for bumping the thread up!

Back to top

Soph


Member

Posted Tue May 26th, 2009 12:17pm Post subject: #3..is there a text version?

That's my name
I've never seen these before they're all so good!
Thank you for bumping the thread up!
lol, that should totally be your avatar.

Photobucket

Back to top

Help


Member

Posted Tue May 26th, 2009 2:33pm Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
I was just changing it

Back to top

Soph


Member

Posted Tue May 26th, 2009 3:54pm Post subject: #3..is there a text version?
lol, it now looks like he wrote that personally for you. And quite frankly, that's awesome.

Photobucket

Back to top