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Spike


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 9:31am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Hi,
I'm new to this forum and I find it very confusing and I have to say it's not easy to find your way around it. My reason for signing up is to ask Stephen if he would use his considerable influence, authority, and broadcast opportunities to try to discourage the increasingly prevalent habit of pronoucing "aitch" as "haitch". The letter is actually spelt out in dictionaries. I don't know where the habit came from but it is fairly recent, and now even the occasional news reporter is doing it. I think it must be a naive idea facetiously invented by someone who was criticised for dropping their aitches. The problem is that the more that it is heard in the media, the more people will think it is acceptable. And the more times they hear a celebrity say it, then if they were unsure before, it would certainly reinforce them in their error. Can you please, please do something to stop this habit before it becomes acceptable, and is ultimately regarded as the the correct form. I'm not one of those people who gets irritated any more by the misplced apostrophe but this one really grates.
Thanks,
Spike

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joan


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 9:35am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
I found my sons were being taught 'haitch' at their catholic primary school here in Queensland Australia. I went to the headmaster to complain. He totally agreed with me, and said the catholic nuns had brought the aberration over from Ireland, and he had tried and failed to get aitch taught.

I ensured my own sons got it right, but alas all the catholiceducated people here still get it wrong.

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absolutely curtains


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 9:36am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Damn right, Spike!

Hi, welcome to the site and everything. Although you'll probably get grilled for not putting this topic on the "words" section of the forum or something...

Just kidding. My friend was trying to tell me the other day that lieutenant was not only spelt leftenant in English, but should always be pronounced lootenant. I told her to shove her lootenant up her pimhole. Bladdy Americans...

Just kidding. I love Americans. I hate Americanisation... if that's even a word.

I really have the tendency to ramble on.


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trouser material


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 5:17pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
This a great topic to introduce yourself with Spike.

I remember as a youngster first hearing H pronounced as HAITCH, and it made me violently angry.

I was probably about 6 years old.

Haitch is yet another sodomisation of the Engilsh language, which will no doubt become the norm as time passes. Along with every other magical aspect of our beautiful language. In fact, its probably already happened. Fucking brahhhhh!!

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Tourmaline


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 7:56pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

I remember as a youngster first hearing H pronounced as HAITCH, and it made me violently angry.


It made my aunts & uncles incredibly angry too, so I am happy to mispronounce my letters just to see how wound up they can get

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absolutely curtains


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 10:28pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
You know what I just remembered?

In reception when I was 4, walking up to my teacher, all 3 feet of me, and telling her that it's actually pronounced aitch, and haitch is WRONG!

I did 2 weeks o' work experience with 4 and 5 year olds back in June, and now I realise the pain of a smartarsed child.

I'm so sorry, Miss...

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Canzonett


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 12:52am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Wow. One never stops learning on this forum. I never knew there was a standard English spelt-out form for the letter H. "Aitch"? Why, I always imagined it being written as "age", and whenever someone began discussing the "th"-sound at school (German: "tih-äitsch"!), I associated the age of T - of the Tyrannosaurus, the tartan and the t-bone steak.

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melampus


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 2:36am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Hi,
I'm new to this forum and I find it very confusing and I have to say it's not easy to find your way around it. My reason for signing up is to ask Stephen if he would use his considerable influence, authority, and broadcast opportunities to try to discourage the increasingly prevalent habit of pronoucing "aitch" as "haitch". The letter is actually spelt out in dictionaries. I don't know where the habit came from but it is fairly recent, and now even the occasional news reporter is doing it. I think it must be a naive idea facetiously invented by someone who was criticised for dropping their aitches. The problem is that the more that it is heard in the media, the more people will think it is acceptable. And the more times they hear a celebrity say it, then if they were unsure before, it would certainly reinforce them in their error. Can you please, please do something to stop this habit before it becomes acceptable, and is ultimately regarded as the the correct form. I'm not one of those people who gets irritated any more by the misplced apostrophe but this one really grates.
Thanks,
Spike

You know what I hate? You know what I REALLY HATE? When someone says "a myriad of ...(things)". It "myriad" NOT "a myriad of"!!!!! ARGGHHGGHGHGH I BLOODY HATE THAT!

Have a pleasant afternoon,

Melampus

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Maniac


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 10:54am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Surely myriad can be used with of!?

A myriad of things.
As well as on its own - myriad words.

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Kaseryn


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 12:25pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
I'm reminded of Eddie Izzards comments about the letter H..


"You say erbs.. and we say herbs. BECAUSE THERE'S A F*CKING H IN IT"


Can we add that to the campaign?

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joan


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 12:43pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
I always pronounce the h on herb. I f you want to use the French pronunciation, you should pronounce the whole thing French, and say 'herbe '(pronounced airb). But no-one woulld understand - so leave the bloody aitch on!!!

I grow a lot of the herbs - just made a quiche with home-grown sage, oregano, sorrell, rocket and parsley in it. )

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trouser material


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 1:27pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

I grow a lot of the herbs - just made a quiche with home-grown sage, oregano, sorrell, rocket and parsley in it. )

Hmmmm, i could eat that right now.

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meekychuppet


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 2:36pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
I sense much anger in this thread young padawan.

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absolutely curtains


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 9:19pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
I'm reminded of Eddie Izzards comments about the letter H..


"You say erbs.. and we say herbs. BECAUSE THERE'S A F*CKING H IN IT"


Can we add that to the campaign?

And he says that we spell "through" like thruff, whereas les Americans have thru... We put the o and g in in the event of an emergency, and the h is there in case some herbs come along.

X-D

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melampus


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 10:46pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Surely myriad can be used with of!?

A myriad of things.
As well as on its own - myriad words.

Well, sort of, but no. One definition of 'myriad' is 'ten thousand', so you can't really a say "a ten thousand of something".

'Myriad' also means 'an indefinitely great number', or 'a very great number of persons or things'. And you can't really say "a a very great number of things of things". Well, you could, but that would be a little strange.

And while I am being a nit-picking pedant, may I express my puzzlement re. why British people say "vit-amins" (i.e. 'vit' is said like 'hit') and everyone else says "vye-tamins". It's the same deal with yoghurt/ yoe-ghurt. I always thought the vowel is 'long' when it isn't followed by a double consonant. But maybe that's just my horrible Aussie accent.

I say 'herbs-with-an-aitch', too! So there!

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