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boffinbabe12


Member

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 6:00pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Well maybe worrying was the wrong word... but seeming to put effort into sorting something out when I don't see it as something of much importance... however if you feel it is important then by all mean do...

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Aoibheann


Member

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 6:09pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Im worrying myself silly.....






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boffinbabe12


Member

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 6:12pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Well there's no need to be sarcastic

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Aoibheann


Member

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 6:13pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Twasnt sarcasm

< i want him but in yellow..

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Britannicus


Member

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 8:58pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Man, I was having fun, now you've gone and taken all that fun away. :'( So mean.

"Your room...it's CLEAN!!!"
"I prayed to God...and...it happened...but...where's my million dollars and horse!? Damn it!"

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 9:26pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
One thing that irritates me is glottal stops in songs. If you're not aware, a glottal stop is the sudden stoppage of sound when you say things like "wha'?" and "bu'er" instead of "what?" and "butter". In speech I have no problem with it - it's a dialect thing and I respect that. You do it unconsciously, whereas pronouncing 't' is a conscious effort. However, when you're singing the reverse is true, so people who put glottal stops in their singing voices are being fake fake fake. This is why I can't stand Lily Allen, why I can't completely enjoy Sleeper songs and why the only track on "Walking Wounded" by Everything But The Girl which I can't stand is Mirrorball ("I mean a lo' I mean a li'le").

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Aoibheann


Member

Posted Sat May 26th, 2007 3:56am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH
Another spelling I hate seeing: congradulations instead of congratulations. Now is the d thing an Americanism or just tons of people on the internet making the same cock-up?

Oh, you should hear it where I live. It's practically a boycott against the letter T. ...Well, not entirely, in THAT sentence we'd say the T in "it's" and "against", while the T in "practically" is a weird hybrid between a d and a t. But in "boycott" the t's are swallowed and "letter" becomes ledder.

Therefore the statement, "I live in Layton by the mountains and I like to drink water" becomes "I live in Lay-in by the moun'uns and I like to drink wodder." Poor letter T. *pats it sympathetically on the head*

It is a poor letter indeed. I've noticed a lot of people my age and younger can't pronounce 'th' properly whether it's 'th' as in 'through' or 'th' as in 'the'. Instead it's changed to a f or a d depending on which one. The amount of times I've heard 'gothic' pronounced as 'gofficks' is maddening. As if the pronounciation wasn't bad enough they add an 's' and turn it into a noun when it's an adjective! *bangs head*

aww lads if you want annoying you should come over to inner city Dublin, in the north side, the accent and pronuciation is hilarious....
A simple sentence like "will you come in for dinner" sounds something like "WIll yiz cum in foh-wer yizer dinnoh" followed by a curse of some kind and a drag of a cig..... I actually want to try and find a sound byte of the accent just so you can hear it... its terrible.

FOUND ONE FOR YOUS! haha... forgot i had this tucked away... its hilarious.. and has exactly the example Saz gives... ! love the accent.. hilarious... Watch it till the end... X-D

be warned tho! it has some language in it... including several mentions of the 'C' word... !

http://bebo.com/watch/3175631247

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missdmeanor


Member

Posted Fri Jul 9th, 2010 2:57pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

Aitch not haitch.

As a teaching assistant at the local village primary school, I am doing my best to teach the children aitch and not haitch, lieutenant and schedule (English not American pronunciations). However, many of the teachers use haitch and the American version of the previous two words. What hope have our youngsters got to learn English correctly (let alone grammer - sitting not sat being a prime example) when their teachers are not aware of their own errors? I'm not perfect (I've probably made a few boo-boos's already) but I know what I know - if you know what I mean!!?

One teacher told me she thought the English pronunciation of lieutenant and schedule were 'formal English' - too much American television I think!

MissD


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Chopper Q Pantypad.


Member

Posted Tue Jul 27th, 2010 10:44pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

The pronunciation of the letter Aitch as Haitch really boils my piss too! It's nice to see there are fellow pedants on this forum. Colleagues tell me to "get a life", but they refuse to stop saying "Haitch", even though I've emailed dictionary definitions to them. My argument is that they don't pronounce their vowels "Hay, Hee, High, Hoe and Hugh" so why say "Haitch"? ........ Maybe I need to get a life!


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LeJeunesse


Member

Posted Wed Jul 28th, 2010 12:58am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

I live in the north west of england but my parents are from London. They learned 'Aitch' and so did I before I went to school. But when I went to school I was taught 'Haitch'. However, my mum and dad said that 'Haitch' is annoying and not right so I've always said 'Aitch' Its taught in schools - what is the world coming to?!

"that woman...of dubious and questionable memory." :P

@twitter

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joan


Member

Posted Wed Jul 28th, 2010 9:34am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

The problem is, grammar has ceased to be taught in many schools, so people will make a lot of mistakes. Using English without understanding how it works, is like driving a car without knowing or understanding what goes on under the bonnet: it is OK until problems arise.

One example of people not understanding the grammar, or how the language works, is the way people use ' you and I'. This is OK if you say something like 'You and I should go shopping now.' But if you say, 'Between you and I.....' it is wrong. It should be 'between you and me'.

The reason for this is that 'I' can only be used as the subject of a sentence or clause: after a preposition it should be 'me'. But if you have not been taught the parts of speech, do not know the grammatical difference between subject, object and indirect object, and have no idea what a preposition is, then you have no idea why 'between you and I' sounds utterly ridiculous.

Often, learning a foreign language helps a lot with understanding the grammar of your your own language, but there is much less incentive for English speakers to learn a foreign language, because our language has become the lingua franca of the world.

Bring back grammar training, and bring back foreign language teaching. You know it makes sense!!


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Quite interested


Member

Posted Wed Sep 14th, 2011 10:30am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

I too joined this site as I looked up "aitch or haitch" and found the forum at the top of my search.

I was always taught that "haitch" is an example of hypercorrection, i.e. people are told not to drop their aitches, but this is the one example where the letter should be left off! It is in the Oxford English dictionary spelt as "aitch"; there is no entry under "haitch".

I've even heard people in call centres in India picking up the habit. Like other readers here, it really grates.


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calcoam


Member

Posted Thu May 2nd, 2013 4:46pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

Actually, aitch is the wrong one. in england and every other english speaking country other than the united states, they say haitch, which means it is proper. saying "aitch" is proper is like saying "color" is proper insted of "colour."


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TobiasMonk


Moderator

Posted Fri May 3rd, 2013 1:38am Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

So then you disagree with the OED, calcoam? Interesting. And actually, colour is middle english, of French derivation, or in other words not very English at all.

I cannot be awake for nothing looks to me as it did before, Or else I am awake for the first time, and all before has been a mean sleep.
Walt Whitman

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Don Wells


Member

Posted Sun Jun 9th, 2013 10:38pm Post subject: AITCH, NOT HAITCH

Now that we've talked "haitch", "congradulations" and "between you and I" to death (and good riddance), can we join forces to ban the word "amazing" from our everyday speech, at least temporarily till it has had time to recover from overuse?
I've vowed never to use it unless something or someone has truly overwhelmed me with wonder. I deliberately use words like "splendid", "excellent", "admirable", even the similar "wonderful" but only because it's NOT overused. I get some funny looks but I've had them all my life. (I don't mean my own facial peculiarities.)
Or do I?


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