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Brunswick


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 6:09pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
Dear all,

I can't help but wonder if Mr. Fry has ever considered that he may be on the autistic spectrum, or, indeed, if he has ever been assessed. Research has suggested that there is a comorbidity between both depression and bipolarity, and Asperger.

I myself am an academic with a history of depression and have been diagnosed as having Asperger's syndrome. No doubt, this makes me biased, but Mr. Fry does display some of the characteristics commonly found among Aspergians. These include:

Poor motor skills
The ability to be alone for long periods of time (I understand from interviews)
An interest in word and word-play
An interest in 'gadgets', computers, etc.
The use of 'professor'-like vocabulary
An extremely good memory for facts
Often viewed as 'eccentric' by others
Ability to concentrate for long periods of time on a single activity/topic
(possibly) an inability to communicate feelings/emotions to others when they occur

There are others on 'the list' which may apply. I have no intention to lable Mr. Fry, but merely wonder if anyone has any information on this. Just as it is important for other sufferers from Bipolar disorder to find that others like them are to be found in all walks of life, including the media, this is also true for Aspergians. Though there is much speculation about people, there are very few 'living greats' who have come out Asperger.

I appreciate any comments and/or thoughts, and would be interested to find out if there are other people on this forum who have direct or indirect experience with Asperger.

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Soph


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 6:54pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
The thought hadn't really crossed my mind. I know quite a bit about Aspergers, with researching for myself. I know alot of people wouldn't know much about it, however I wouldn't put it past Stephen, I think he'd know something about it. Perhaps, if he thought it may be a possiblity of having AS he may of been assessed.

Thinking about it now, I can definitely see how if could be a possibilty for Stephen. I think aspects can be ticked off. I thought he doesn't have problems in speech and communicating because Stephen is highly intelligent, talks fluently in perfect English. But if you look deeper, were he's says in Moab Is My Washpot, he talks about teachers couldn't understand him as a child because he talked too quickly. And I think Stephen didn't realise this becuase he was functioning on a different level, so I can see how that can be seen as Aspergers syndrome.

I'm still at the point of wanting to be assessed, it's being proved impossible to get any sort of assessment. I went to my doctors about two years ago and talk of depression only lead me to be seen to an 'under 18s' clinic 'cause they thought I was depressed, but all I want is an assessment for AS. It's ridiculous after a number of referals I don't seem to be getting anywhere.

Photobucket

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amberzak


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 8:30pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
This was a post I put up quite a few months ago, about the simularities between High Functioning Autism.

I just need to point out that I am still waiting for a diagnoses for something, but because, as you said, there are so many simularities, it may be that I am actually bi-polar, or it could be something completely dfferent.

http://www.stephenfry.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2552&highlight=

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Brunswick


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 10:00pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
Perhaps, if he thought it may be a possiblity of having AS he may of been assessed.

>This is what I would assume too, however, the realisation of having Bipolar seems to have come rather late in life to him.

Thinking about it now, I can definitely see how if could be a possibilty for Stephen. I think aspects can be ticked off. I thought he doesn't have problems in speech and communicating because Stephen is highly intelligent, talks fluently in perfect English. But if you look deeper, were he's says in Moab Is My Washpot, he talks about teachers couldn't understand him as a child because he talked too quickly.

> Interestingly, there is a difference between High-Functioning Autism and Asperger, in that the former is characerised by delayed language language developement, whereas with the latter, children may actually be able to read and write at a very young age (3, in my case).


I'm still at the point of wanting to be assessed, it's being proved impossible to get any sort of assessment. I went to my doctors about two years ago and talk of depression only lead me to be seen to an 'under 18s' clinic 'cause they thought I was depressed, but all I want is an assessment for AS. It's ridiculous after a number of referals I don't seem to be getting anywhere. ->

> I have had a similar experience. Assessment tools are often aimed at children, unfortunately. A helpful tool may be Simon Baron-Cohen's website (yes, he is related to Sasha); he has developed a self-assessment tool for adults which is much more appropriate. You could take this test and print out the results to discuss this with an expert (I was referred to an autism centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, through my GP on the basis of one). Another author to read up on is Utha Frith, who has some interesting theories about the way the brain functions in those on the autism spectrum.

Thank you for your comments.

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gadgetgirl


Member

Posted Fri Oct 31st, 2008 12:22pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger


> I have had a similar experience. Assessment tools are often aimed at children, unfortunately. A helpful tool may be Simon Baron-Cohen's website (yes, he is related to Sasha); he has developed a self-assessment tool for adults which is much more appropriate. You could take this test and print out the results to discuss this with an expert (I was referred to an autism centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, through my GP on the basis of one). Another author to read up on is Utha Frith, who has some interesting theories about the way the brain functions in those on the autism spectrum.

Thank you for your comments.

Hi Brunswick, I've had a look at his website and found an excel spreadsheet with a few questions on it - is that what you meant? Is there something a bit more detailed?

That would be me.

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Brunswick


Member

Posted Fri Oct 31st, 2008 7:22pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger


> I have had a similar experience. Assessment tools are often aimed at children, unfortunately. A helpful tool may be Simon Baron-Cohen's website (yes, he is related to Sasha); he has developed a self-assessment tool for adults which is much more appropriate. You could take this test and print out the results to discuss this with an expert (I was referred to an autism centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, through my GP on the basis of one). Another author to read up on is Utha Frith, who has some interesting theories about the way the brain functions in those on the autism spectrum.

Thank you for your comments.

Hi Brunswick, I've had a look at his website and found an excel spreadsheet with a few questions on it - is that what you meant? Is there something a bit more detailed?

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Fri Oct 31st, 2008 8:08pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
"Interestingly, there is a difference between High-Functioning Autism and Asperger, in that the former is characerised by delayed language language developement, whereas with the latter, children may actually be able to read and write at a very young age."


Soph wrote this and i read the previous thread on this.

Other aspects of my mentality were diagnosed as BPD/PTSD, but i "self-diagnosed" autistic spectrum myself, and from another person I knew. The criteria sort of fit AS and my friend was described as HF Autism. So i thought these were the same thing. You point out the difference above and this makes sense to me as being HFA not AS. Also the CuriousIOTDAN I could understand completely - the way he saw things, apart from the different coloured food aspect.

Does this sound sense to you Soph?

Chris

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Brunswick


Member

Posted Sun Nov 2nd, 2008 12:34pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
Other aspects of my mentality were diagnosed as BPD/PTSD, but i "self-diagnosed" autistic spectrum myself, and from another person I knew. The criteria sort of fit AS and my friend was described as HF Autism. So i thought these were the same thing. You point out the difference above and this makes sense to me as being HFA not AS. Also the CuriousIOTDAN I could understand completely - the way he saw things, apart from the different coloured food aspect.

Does this sound sense to you Soph?

Chris[/quote]

Hi Chris, I am sorry. There is a slight misunderstanding. The quote starting with > was mine; I inserted it in Soph's message. And yes, your experiences do make sense. Many HFAs and Aspies diagnose themselves before they get an official diagnosis. As to the difference between the two, until recently there was a debate among psychologist whether they were really the same thing or not. More recently, differences have been found in brain scans and behaviours and it is now more or less accepted that there is a difference between them. (Having said that, psychological labels are always largely a self-fulfilling prophecy ...). For your information, there are many books out there written by people on the autistic spectrum, which could help you find out about feelings, behaviours etc. that you may recognise and others that you don't. Best to start with Temple Grandin's "Thinking in Pictures", I would say.

Best,
Brunswck

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Mon Nov 3rd, 2008 11:44am Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
That is very helpful, Brunswick, thank you.

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gadgetgirl


Member

Posted Thu Feb 19th, 2009 12:58pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
If anyone wants to take the Autism Spectrum Quotient test then Wired have an automated web form here:
http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/aqtest.html

I'll just say I'm not hugely surprised at my results and leave it at that!

That would be me.

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Thu Feb 19th, 2009 1:12pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
32

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fryfan20


Member

Posted Thu Feb 19th, 2009 1:57pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
25 (think the test doesn't work to well )

I am what I am

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Thu Feb 19th, 2009 1:58pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
is a odd result!

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fryfan20


Member

Posted Thu Feb 19th, 2009 2:21pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
25 (think the test doesn't work to well )

or I wasn't completely honest?
I find if difficult with these test not to pick the "right" answers over the truth. (makes sense?) I'm not sure why, just do.

I am what I am

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gadgetgirl


Member

Posted Thu Feb 19th, 2009 2:38pm Post subject: Bipolarity, depression and asperger
Well I was higher than both of you! But not a lot. Some of the questions were difficult, and seemed a little loaded. I tried to be honest but of course I am biased with opinions of myself.

That would be me.

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