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Daefuin


Member

Posted Thu Dec 6th, 2007 5:07pm Post subject: English Aunts?
Hi there, guys!

I'm doing a research on English aunts, and would really appreciate you sharing opinion with me.

How do you think,
What qualities do English aunts have? (no, really, it's a serious question :)))

It can be just a list of adjectives/nouns, or a detailed description, doesn't matter.

Thanks!

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Thu Dec 6th, 2007 6:51pm Post subject: English Aunts?
If Wodehouse is anything to go buy, English aunts are evil creatures with voices that sound like of a troop of cavalry crossing a tin bridge, "aunt calling to aunt like mastodons bellowing across the primeval swamp".

I'm sorry, that wasn't very helpful, was it? But I couldn't resist. I'm afraid I can't help you, I don't have any English aunts. I could help out with German aunts, though.

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Thu Dec 6th, 2007 7:01pm Post subject: English Aunts?
Obsessed with knitting and always kaling with neighbours. Once they get you on the phone it's impossible to get them to stop talking.

Assuming direct control...

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Daefuin


Member

Posted Thu Dec 6th, 2007 9:34pm Post subject: English Aunts?
If Wodehouse is anything to go buy, English aunts are evil creatures with voices that sound like of a troop of cavalry crossing a tin bridge, "aunt calling to aunt like mastodons bellowing across the primeval swamp".

Wodehouse has, in fact, everything to do with it.
Oh, I shouldn't have said this, 'cause it must have put you off the scent.
In a sense that I'd like to hear anything about aunts primarily from the "realistic" (don't know how to put it better) point of view, not from the "humourous" one.

But thanks, Soupy Twist, anyway
I remember the quote about mastodons and love it passionately))
Although, I believe that the cavalry-crossing-a-tin-bridge quote is about Honoria laughing (oh dear, don't start me on Wodehouse :))

amyl_nitrate,
It's great, thanks!

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seasun545


Member

Posted Thu Dec 6th, 2007 10:08pm Post subject: English Aunts?
X-D X-D
This thread should be labeled as the weirdest ever!!!


Sorry canĀ“t help...

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Nil


Member

Posted Thu Dec 6th, 2007 10:31pm Post subject: English Aunts?
I have several English aunts (as I am English), all of whom are around the age of thirty. They all have very different personalities, ranging from slightly immature and impulsive, loud and obnoxious, cheap and outspoken, to cheerful and busy.

They're not much different to any other adults I know; there are certainly no specific "aunt" qualities that I can deduce. I'm actually wondering if I understood this topic properly..

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Thu Dec 6th, 2007 11:25pm Post subject: English Aunts?
i only have american ants.

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joan


Member

Posted Fri Dec 7th, 2007 2:07am Post subject: English Aunts?
It all depends on if they are an aunt or an aunty.

I'm an aunty - a friendly, slightly eccentric family member living in a strange place with an ex-sailor for a husband.

If I were one kind of aunt, I'd be grumpy, spinsterish, formal, and plain, with no use whatsoever apart from a possible source of inheritiance.

Another kind of aunt is the intrepid world travellor, going where no woman should have gone before, and sending letters and presents from strange and scary places.

But lets face it, any female whose siblings have reproduced is an aunt or an aunty.

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Desdemona


Member

Posted Fri Dec 7th, 2007 5:27pm Post subject: English Aunts?
Urrrm i'm english and im a aunty to 3, also im 15... do i count?

They are just like normal people. (not counting me, 'cus im slightly weird) ]
though i do have this one aunt who like to boss me around A LOT.
she is nice though. and they give me money... so i can't complain really.


[quote="joan"]
Another kind of aunt is the intrepid world travellor, going where no woman should have gone before, and sending letters and presents from strange and scary places.
[quote]
My Friend has an aunt just like that, she has just come back from africa and living with lions.

Skip Life and come with me?

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busy clippers


Member

Posted Sat Dec 8th, 2007 12:01am Post subject: English Aunts?
I've always wanted an English aunt. One with sensible shoes and good stationery. Is there an export scheme?

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stephen_is_god


Member

Posted Sat Dec 8th, 2007 2:37pm Post subject: English Aunts?
Whats the difference between an English aunt and anyother type of aunt??
I am English and I have 4 aunts and none of them are remotely the same ... and they all have nothing in common except that they are my aunts ... Why are you doing research on English aunts exactly?

well I'll give you some information any way

aunt 1: A fashion designer has a few boutiques in London and a line in Top Shop, in her late 30s, artistic, good with children but has none of her own, used to play with me a lot when I was young, her name was the first word I said, always in fluffy pink things, dark features, very slender and small, extremely frenetic taste likes anything bright and crazy, forgets when your birthday is,

aunt2: works for Paul Smith and is a graphic designer, late 30s, wanted to be a ballet dancer when she was 16 but couldn't afford the school fees, very shy and retiring, tall and slim, lives in the barbican, very minimalist, all clothes are various shades of grey wool, her and my uncle share clothes, also good with children but has none of her own, knows when your birthday is but is too shy to call you

aunt3: mid 40s, a nurse, quite abrupt and scary, don't let her brush your hair it hurts ... a lot, typical west country type, quite nice and friendly but knows how to hit you, I haven't seen her in over 5 years ... probably why I have such a childlike view of her

aunt4: A nursery nurse, also in her late 30s, the most typically aunt-like of the 4, bubbly and quite loud, very funny, absolutely doting on her son, gives good presents, very mainsteam fashion sense, though quite young for her age, huge breasts, not patronising or condesending

hope that helps

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Sat Dec 8th, 2007 4:45pm Post subject: English Aunts?
Whats the difference between an English aunt and anyother type of aunt??
I am English and I have 4 aunts and none of them are remotely the same ... and they all have nothing in common except that they are my aunts ... Why are you doing research on English aunts exactly?

I thought the question was meant to be a joke.

Assuming direct control...

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Daefuin


Member

Posted Sat Dec 8th, 2007 5:45pm Post subject: English Aunts?
Thanks for your answers, everyone!

It's not a joke, unfortunately... I'm writing a term paper on Wodehousian humour, and in the course of my writing, so to speak, my scientific adviser told me to find information on qualities of English aunts.

That is how I live, what?

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Sun Dec 23rd, 2007 3:54am Post subject: English Aunts?
while the aunts in the wodehouse books are really funny... i think this is my favorite aunt. she's not british, just awesome.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Us8GGg02n9U&feature=related

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Philip Troy


Member

Posted Sat Sep 28th, 2013 9:09pm Post subject: English Aunts?

The thing to remember about English aunts of the Wodehouse variety is that in the context of Wodehouse's lifetime, fewer people were raised by parents: between the public and other boarding school-based educational system and the colonial thing, the parent was not necessarily the be-all and end-all of the child's authority figures, so the aunts and uncles with which one lived, depended on financially at times, etc., were essentially "beaks", stern, judgemental figures who were the arbiters of all propriety; especially so in 1900. The "Aunt bellowing to Aunt like mastodons across a primeval swamp", Lord Worplesdon with his heavy boot and riding crop, these were tropes many more among Wodehouse's readers would identify with then than today. It wasn't entirely about them being English; rather, it was all the stuff being English in the late Victorian and Edwardian ages represented.


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