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joan


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 1:14pm Post subject: english
A few people here have an interest in language: I certainly have, anyway,
I read that Finnish children learn English from grade 1 - is that true? I have read that it is a language unrelated to the other European languages, apart from Hungarian. Seems strange, given the geography, that it isn't a Scandinavian or Slavonic language. A lass I used to work with married a Finn, and trying to learn the language for a family reunion in Finland almost drove her insane! There's a Finnish Hall here in Brisbane, and that is where she had her lessons.

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karoliina


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 1:39pm Post subject: english
Whn I was a kid, we had to start learning english when we were 9 - nowadays they can choose which foreign language to study; Russian, English, French, German, Italian..
Finnish is related to Hungarian for some strange reason, we don't understand each other but words have similar pronunciation etc. Estonian is quite similar, I think we might have been part of the same culture at some point in history or something.
My other half is a kiwi,and he has given up learning finnish even before he started!

hello to Brisbane, I bet its nice and sunny........!To your comfort, it's raining here in London!

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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 3:45pm Post subject: english
Whn I was a kid, we had to start learning english when we were 9 - nowadays they can choose which foreign language to study; Russian, English, French, German, Italian..
Finnish is related to Hungarian for some strange reason, we don't understand each other but words have similar pronunciation etc. Estonian is quite similar, I think we might have been part of the same culture at some point in history or something.

Slavic tribes had a word for all Finno-Ugric and Estonian tribes way back in the day, about a thousand years ago: "chud'" - "the very odd bunch".

What flavor of Finnish do you speak?

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karoliina


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 4:57pm Post subject: english
I didn't know that! Thats really cool!

Flavour? Don't get that...?

According to some legend, the russians had a saying " Finland is the devil's country" because they didn't understand a word we were saying, and because we were "black on the face" ie not smiling much

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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Mon Apr 2nd, 2007 4:09am Post subject: english
By flavor, I mean dialect. The only Finnish I know is a song in Savo.

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karoliina


Member

Posted Tue Apr 3rd, 2007 12:01am Post subject: english
Thats mine! Its the most hill-billy dialect of them all!

how weird, how can you know that?!!and what is it?

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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Tue Apr 3rd, 2007 12:20am Post subject: english
Thats mine! Its the most hill-billy dialect of them all!

how weird, how can you know that?!!and what is it?

I love hill-billy dialects! My favorite dialect of German is Bavarian. I listen to Dingolstadt Comedy show all the time... which drives my boy insane - he doesn't know any German of any kind and all he can say is "They sound drunk!"

Dude, too bad you don't live around Chicago... I would SO love to hang out with someone who can teach me a bit of Finnish. Especially Savo.

Don't know any "black in the face" things about Finns in Russia. Finns are considered, as far as I know, somewhat stuttery in speech (because of all the doubling in letters), very in tune with nature and ecology, rather uninclined to flights of fancy or drama, depressive and often drunk. Sort of like Tolkien's elves, if any of them had been melancholy alcoholics.

As for the song - the one I know goes "nuapurista kuulu se polokkan tahti jalakani pohjii kutkutti, Ievan äiti se tyttöösä vahti vaan kyllähän Ieva sen jutkutti..." Bet you've heard that one I can listen to that bloody song on loop for hours on end... wait, I do listen to that song on loop for hours on end... heh!

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Tue Apr 3rd, 2007 12:21pm Post subject: english

I love hill-billy dialects! My favorite dialect of German is Bavarian. I listen to Dingolstadt Comedy show all the time... which drives my boy insane - he doesn't know any German of any kind and all he can say is "They sound drunk!"

He has a point, it really sounds slurred. And the guys in the Stammtisch bits are supposed to sound slightly drunk.

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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Wed Apr 4th, 2007 12:18am Post subject: english

I love hill-billy dialects! My favorite dialect of German is Bavarian. I listen to Dingolstadt Comedy show all the time... which drives my boy insane - he doesn't know any German of any kind and all he can say is "They sound drunk!"

He has a point, it really sounds slurred. And the guys in the Stammtisch bits are supposed to sound slightly drunk.

Well, obviously - but he says that when he hears the introductions. Everything from the initial "Gruess Gott" on, basically.

Stammtisch aktuell... mwa hah hah... PROST!!

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Wed Apr 4th, 2007 2:55pm Post subject: english

Stammtisch aktuell... mwa hah hah... PROST!!

Prost!

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filliamhmuffin


Member

Posted Wed Apr 4th, 2007 11:35pm Post subject: english
How about we change it to " Twats and Todgers" when addressing a room full of Conservative supporters.

I'll second that.

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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Wed Apr 4th, 2007 11:41pm Post subject: english
So how popular is Dingolstadt, anyway? I have no socio-cultural perspective on it - I listen to it in my Chicago flat and it's wicked funny, but I know I'm missing, like, 80% of the in-jokes.

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filliamhmuffin


Member

Posted Thu Apr 5th, 2007 12:01am Post subject: english
In Mandarin Chinese, honorifics are less about sex and more about age difference, although within the family they have different words for older brother, younger brother, mother's sister, father's sister, etc....

But between non-family, it's tongzhi (comrade) for someone of a similar age Shushu (uncle) or xiansheng for an older man; daniang (aunt) or taitai for an older woman. Actually, you can differentiate further: for instance, shushu is for a man older than you and younger than your father, whereas bobo is for a man older than your father. I'm not sure how much these distinctions matter amongst the younger, more urban population, though.

I know Chinese isn't even an Indo-European language, and not really helpful in terms of this thread other than to illustrate how it is so much more formal than English. In fact, it's this kind of thing that makes Chinese such a pain to learn--I would hate to be either overly formal or disrespectful in conversation, and it's hard to wrap my mind around the intricacies of their honorifics. I'm sure i'll screw up at least several dozen times while I'm there before it becomes familiar territory.

Anyway, it's easier than conjugating spanish verbs.

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Thu Apr 5th, 2007 11:17am Post subject: english
So how popular is Dingolstadt, anyway? I have no socio-cultural perspective on it - I listen to it in my Chicago flat and it's wicked funny, but I know I'm missing, like, 80% of the in-jokes.

Difficult question. Dingolstadt radio is broadcast from a small attic in Schrobenhausen. Ordinary radio listeners might have never heard of the station at all, because it's an internet radio. But the comedy show now has more than 70.000 downloads per month (don't know where the downloaders come from, but would be interesting to know), which is amazing for such a tiny station. They would be absolutely thrilled to know that their show is listened to regularly by a Russian-American in a Chicago flat. You should write to them

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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Thu Apr 5th, 2007 2:47pm Post subject: english
So how popular is Dingolstadt, anyway? I have no socio-cultural perspective on it - I listen to it in my Chicago flat and it's wicked funny, but I know I'm missing, like, 80% of the in-jokes.

Difficult question. Dingolstadt radio is broadcast from a small attic in Schrobenhausen. Ordinary radio listeners might have never heard of the station at all, because it's an internet radio. But the comedy show now has more than 70.000 downloads per month (don't know where the downloaders come from, but would be interesting to know), which is amazing for such a tiny station. They would be absolutely thrilled to know that their show is listened to regularly by a Russian-American in a Chicago flat. You should write to them

I think I have, actually...

70,0 downloads per month, whoa. Sure sign that they're doing *something* right.

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