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Mares


Member

Posted Wed Oct 29th, 2008 11:29pm Post subject: Episode 3
I don't understand the fascination with Obama. Sure he gives a good speech (while reading from a teleprompter) but his unprepared comments are full of stutters and stammers like Bush. His actual accomplishments are too few to mention.
Ah well, we truly live in a celebrity obsessed culture. All hail the Celebrity in Chief...

Nor do I. He really doesn't have any accomplishments, for example, taking 50 million dollars, not to hire teachers with math and science degrees, buy decent textbooks and improve inner city schools, but to fund a program that wasted the money, attempting to propagandize these kids with Marxism studies. As a dem, I don't appreciate other parallels between Obama and Bush, taking money from a corrupt builder, allowing him to rip off the poor and elderly by getting millions inn state grants, and building substandard housing, where not even the heat works, and it's on the site of a chemical dump. He refuses to answer questions, it's pointless to go on. I voted for him, but I hope he's not elected.

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bmkealu


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 3:03am Post subject: Episode 3
I know some European's I have spoken to seem a little confused on why the electorial college thing exists. But it goes back to the point of the show, America is like 50 small countries, each distinct and unique, with their own rules (many laws are different in each one) and culture. And therefore the president has to win a majority in 50 separate elections.


The United States is not a Democracy; rather, it is a Federal Republic, and we all know it was founded by the landed gentry from Great Britain. The Electoral College was a compromise between Congress electing the President and the President being elected by popular vote -- the founding fathers thought the peasants too stupid to directly elect the President... they didn't really want to give soooooo much power to the ignorant, unwashed masses.

By the way, nothing in the US Constitution requires a state's electors to cast their electoral votes based on the popular outcome in that state. For example, if a state has 5 electors and the popular vote is for candidate A, 1-5 of those electors could in reality cast his/her electoral vote for candidate B. Some states have laws to prevent this but most do not.

I finally got around to watching episode 3 and thought it was hilarious when he got to WI and MN and was dressed like he was in Siberia! And I would have liked to have seen more of his performance with Second City - does anyone know if the DVD is going to contain additional footage?

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IdeaCollector


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 4:08am Post subject: Episode 3
Excellent episode. I'm one of those Scandiwegians he mentioned. I was born in Wisconsin about 2 miles from the bridge into minnesota.

The homeless bit hand me thinking b/c I used to work with the homeless and still have several homeless friends. Most homeless people are soo friendly and kind if you aren't completely put off by them.

It's true...I have been hugged by my share of homeless gentlemen and ladies.

Have you hugged your homeless lately? (should be the motto for Flint Michigan...poor town).

I used to be EternalStudent on these forums until the switch over. So don't get excited..I'm not someone new and exciting. I'm just me :P

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MartyKS


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 1:30pm Post subject: Episode 3
I know some European's I have spoken to seem a little confused on why the electorial college thing exists. But it goes back to the point of the show, America is like 50 small countries, each distinct and unique, with their own rules (many laws are different in each one) and culture. And therefore the president has to win a majority in 50 separate elections.


The United States is not a Democracy; rather, it is a Federal Republic, and we all know it was founded by the landed gentry from Great Britain. The Electoral College was a compromise between Congress electing the President and the President being elected by popular vote -- the founding fathers thought the peasants too stupid to directly elect the President... they didn't really want to give soooooo much power to the ignorant, unwashed masses.

By the way, nothing in the US Constitution requires a state's electors to cast their electoral votes based on the popular outcome in that state. For example, if a state has 5 electors and the popular vote is for candidate A, 1-5 of those electors could in reality cast his/her electoral vote for candidate B. Some states have laws to prevent this but most do not.

I finally got around to watching episode 3 and thought it was hilarious when he got to WI and MN and was dressed like he was in Siberia! And I would have liked to have seen more of his performance with Second City - does anyone know if the DVD is going to contain additional footage?

Sorry, but your take on the Electoral College is all wrong. The purpose of the EC was to recognize the disparity of populations in the agricultural states (less populated) versus the industrialized states (heavily populated). This allows rural states influence in national elections. If there were no EC you would never see candidates campaigning anywhere other than New York or California.
Which, come to think of it, might be a good thing.

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wooden_elf


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 6:40pm Post subject: Episode 3
A wonderful episode. In my opinion the best so far. I'm so glad they mentioned Huck Finn as I dreamt of being their friends when I was a girl and was so sad I was born in the wrong century.

I loved it when he tried to milk the sheep. You are bloody priceless, Stephen!!!!!!

And am I the only one who thought it was sort of cheating when they jigged with a camera on the ice. Where's the fun in that? *shrugs*

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Mares


Member

Posted Fri Oct 31st, 2008 4:00am Post subject: Episode 3
I know some European's I have spoken to seem a little confused on why the electorial college thing exists. But it goes back to the point of the show, America is like 50 small countries, each distinct and unique, with their own rules (many laws are different in each one) and culture. And therefore the president has to win a majority in 50 separate elections.


The United States is not a Democracy; rather, it is a Federal Republic, and we all know it was founded by the landed gentry from Great Britain. The Electoral College was a compromise between Congress electing the President and the President being elected by popular vote -- the founding fathers thought the peasants too stupid to directly elect the President... they didn't really want to give soooooo much power to the ignorant, unwashed masses.

By the way, nothing in the US Constitution requires a state's electors to cast their electoral votes based on the popular outcome in that state. For example, if a state has 5 electors and the popular vote is for candidate A, 1-5 of those electors could in reality cast his/her electoral vote for candidate B. Some states have laws to prevent this but most do not.

I finally got around to watching episode 3 and thought it was hilarious when he got to WI and MN and was dressed like he was in Siberia! And I would have liked to have seen more of his performance with Second City - does anyone know if the DVD is going to contain additional footage?

Sorry, Bmkealu, but I'm calling shenanigans on you..

The US is a democratic republic, not a straight democracy, but a combination of democratic and republican forms of government. Our founders examined both forms of government that they admired, and sought to choose a combination of the two, to avoid the hopeless messes that either form alone brought about.

For whatever foibles, the founding fathers might have had, they created a truly unique structure for the US government. Something amazing, that had the potential to rise far above the limits of their particular time in history.

I wouldn't apply too much credence to the remark about "peasants", because some of our founding fathers came from, what those in the old world would have considered "peasants". If you care for the truth, the term "peasants" originated in the same place that created the generic term "the masses", to indicate a faceless, group of the most powerless, who lacked a voice and a vote. Here in the US, we are not limited by antiquated designations like whatever class one happens to be born into. The founders resisted any notions of gentry, and in fact our first president refused the title of king that was offered to him. Again, they weren't perfect by a long shot, but they were head and shoulders above the sorry lot that leads not only the United States, and those seeking the office of president (and I mean both Obama and McCain), but also those leading the UK, France, Spain, Germany and the rest of Europe, Russia, the Arab World, the Middle East, Asia, the entire world.

The electoral college did NOT come about to deny the average people the vote, but was a mechanism so as to not drown out the votes of people in less populated states, by the massive number of votes from those in more populated states. It's not perfect, again what is? Certainly not the dogma that sprang from the diseased mindset that birthed Marxism. The great Dr. Martin Luther King said it best, that "Communism and socialism deny a man the right to self determination, without that right, a man is a slave".

Among my favorite of the founders, is the amazing John Adams. He was the son of a man who was a poor parson and dirt farmer. John and his wife Abigal did not own slaves, they freed slaves, and paid them wages, they did not believe in slavery, and Abigal was one of the early proponents of women's rights. They were amazing people, and he became one of our great presidents.

Oops, almost forgot so I'm editing this in. The son of John Adams, John Quincy Adams (another fine president), in his old age, represented the prisoners from the slave ship, the Amistad. He didn't do it for money, or praise, but in the interest of justice and freedom.

Another of our founders, the great Stephen Hopkins was the representative from the littlest state in the union, Rhode Island. Hopkins was born to a family of farmers in Scituate, RI. His ancestor, also named Stephen Hopkins, who came to the New World, in the Mayflower, was a tanner.

Hopkins spoke out against British tyranny long before the revolutionary period. In 1764 he published a pamphlet "The Rights of the Colonies Examined" whose broad distribution and criticism of taxation and Parliament built his reputation as a revolutionary leader.

In 1773, he freed his slaves, and the following year, while serving in the Rhode Island Assembly in 1774, he introduced a bill that prohibited the importation of slaves into the colony. This became one of the first anti-slavery laws in the new United States.

He led the colony's delegation to the Continental Congress later in 1774, along with Samuel Ward, and was a proud signer of the Declaration of Independence. He recorded his name with a trembling right hand, which he had to guide with his left. Hopkins had cerebral palsy, and was noted to have said, as he signed the Declaration, "My hand trembles, my heart does not."

Hopkins was such a stickler for rights and freedoms, that he withheld his signature to the Constitution, until it included many of the rights and freedoms that Americans most prize today.

Yes, I'm an awful, long winded blowhard on the subject, but it's because I love my country, and all Americans have the right to be proud. I can't sit back and allow either ignorance of or indifference to the facts pass unchallenged.

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Mares


Member

Posted Fri Oct 31st, 2008 5:17am Post subject: Episode 3
Excellent episode. I'm one of those Scandiwegians he mentioned. I was born in Wisconsin about 2 miles from the bridge into minnesota.

The homeless bit hand me thinking b/c I used to work with the homeless and still have several homeless friends. Most homeless people are soo friendly and kind if you aren't completely put off by them.

It's true...I have been hugged by my share of homeless gentlemen and ladies.

Have you hugged your homeless lately? (should be the motto for Flint Michigan...poor town).

Yeah, that's for damned sure.There is a tent city in Grand Rapids, at least I saw only one. Here in Kazoo, many, many poor, and even formerly middle class have become homeless.

What gets my goat, is that the media doesn't report about it. Even so called alternative media like NPR. Last spring, they were doing a story about animal shelters, and were outside the shelter here in Kalamazoo, interviewing people that came to the shelter. They spoke with a woman who was bringing her cat to the shelter, and asked her why. The woman had lost her job about six or so months before, and then lost her home. She'd been trying to find another job, and ended up living in her car, keeping the cat with her, hoping that she would find a job, and get a place to live, but after sticking it out for a few months, she felt it was cruel to keep the cat in the car. I was heartbroken, couldn't stop crying. The reporter moved on from that without skipping a beat.. frankly, if I'd have been there, I'd have wrung her neck. How could she be so blasé, when there but for the grace of God, it could be her?

Since then, had she or NPR actually cared (they're supposed to be so liberal) they would have reported on the subject, but not one story.

In Kazoo, entire communities have been displaced, the Gibson guiltar factory, the Phizer Pharmaceutical factory, the automobile plants and many others have gone to Mexico, Asia and elsewhere. When I saw Obama kissing up to Bill "the shill" Clinton the other night, I wanted to scream.

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Mushroomoid Miss


Member

Posted Sat Nov 1st, 2008 2:18pm Post subject: Episode 3
I was delighted by the wonderful array of headgear this week!!!!! How funny was that white head sock thing?! Also delighted to see that his lovely hair had grown back. Not so delighted to see the broken arm, though (was anyone else really concerned by the one armed driving?).

I've rather misunderstood Burt and his bat sperm.

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monochromeprincess


Member

Posted Sat Nov 1st, 2008 3:12pm Post subject: Episode 3
Also delighted to see that his lovely hair had grown back. Not so delighted to see the broken arm, though (was anyone else really concerned by the one armed driving?).

Yes, the hair was much appreciated by me! Return of the flappy fluffiness!
And yes, I thought the same, I said 'He better not be driving with that arm!' when I was watching it, like some sort of overprotective grandmother. What amazed me was how quickly it seemed to 'disappear' throughout the episode - brings home the time they spent on it, really.

@dreamingshadow

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Katrina


Member

Posted Sat Nov 1st, 2008 8:45pm Post subject: Episode 3
The one-armed driving scared me a little at first, but then I realized I'm just as bad with my one-knee driving while changing outfits! X-D

And it was very refreshing to see the return of the floppy hair, even though it was hidden under various hats.

Open to suggestions as to what my sig should consist of...

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nickb123


Member

Posted Mon Nov 3rd, 2008 9:04pm Post subject: Episode 3
As ever, I thoroughly enjoyed this episode, having only just caught up on BBC iPlayer (how did I forget about it!).

The highlight for me, however, was not the locations in this episode (though they were fantastic), but seeing Stephen do a bit of improv stand-up! I thought the response of "strabismus" to "what is the sexiest word you see when looking into my eyes" was so witty, and delivered with perfect comedic timing. Still got it, Stephen!

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sarahem


Member

Posted Fri Nov 7th, 2008 8:46am Post subject: Episode 3
Hello!

I was so so pleased with this episode when I saw that Mr. Fry spoke with the wonderful Mee Moua in Saint Paul. Very often, even when they are US productions, travel shows only depict Minnesota as cold and silly and rural. The state is, of course, varied in people, ideas and season and it was wonderful to see a little of that diversity within a small segment. I grew up in a town of 500 people and now live in inner Saint Paul, and neither my country nor my city self was unsatisfied.

On a selfish note, I was honestly dreading how Minnesotans in particular would be shown (as I am assuming that this is how many people in the UK would gather information about the state..) because I am planning to study abroad at Cambridge next year. After making this plan I began to research and found many television programs and articles where the attitude seemed a bit.. unhappy (?) with us in general, and I was soon dreading being an American there. If that had been combined with a popular program depicting my specific state as stupid, I would have been hugely daunted by the prospect of constantly explaining that I am a product of public school in a state of apparent imbeciles, but no really, I can actually think too! So, thank you. I really do appreciate it, even if it only quieted my anxiety a bit with little impact on real perceptions.

Also, I am definitely loving the whole series, not only the parts that are in my state!

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Wed Nov 12th, 2008 11:22am Post subject: Episode 3
It was in Louisiana: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_State_Penitentiary

Another great episode, I particularly laughed at Stephen's reaction the sheep's lady parts!

I loved that bit too. Embarassed Stephen is always cute. ^_^

I never fail to be shocked at the devastation in New Orleans.

That section was really upsetting and shocking to see. I felt so angry to hearing what they were saying about if the area had been rich it wouldn't look like that now. It reminds me of the taxi driver from New York's conversation about the poor being shunted out of places like Harlem because they rich suddenly want to be there.

I know some European's I have spoken to seem a little confused on why the electorial college thing exists. But it goes back to the point of the show, America is like 50 small countries, each distinct and unique, with their own rules (many laws are different in each one) and culture.

Does that ever get confusing? The differing laws I mean when you're travelling from state to state. Like do you ever find yourself breaking a law without realising because you didn't realise it was different to the state you're from?


It was nice to see by the end he was using the arm, I was worried how much he could do with it.

I never even noticed when he stopped wearing the sling. It just got to a point near the end when I realised "Oh yeah he was wearing a sling earlier wasn't he?" :-//

The blues in all its forms, Morgan on the couch outside the club, wished I could have sat there with them all night long, drinking, listen to the delta blues and shootin' shit.

I loved that scene too. I liked all the blues music in this episode.

Stephen's little giggle and smile after he says "This place is turning me into a...babbling merchant of drivel" was so adorable.

Also adorable? The fact that even sheep girly bits make Stephen flustered and uncomfortable. X-D

Those bits were funny, adorable and cute. ^_^


OMG Improv!Stephen. And Wilde-quoting!Stephen. And trying to remember the name of that guy who plays House. Hugh . . . And he was totally flirting with those actors from Second City.


OMG he totally was! I thought so too. And I'm sure that guy was fanboy squeeing when Stephen went into total wordy mode. ^_^

Also delighted to see that his lovely hair had grown back. Not so delighted to see the broken arm, though (was anyone else really concerned by the one armed driving?).

Yes, the hair was much appreciated by me! Return of the flappy fluffiness!
And yes, I thought the same, I said 'He better not be driving with that arm!' when I was watching it, like some sort of overprotective grandmother. What amazed me was how quickly it seemed to 'disappear' throughout the episode - brings home the time they spent on it, really.

The floppy hair was appreciated by me too. I'm so happy it's back.

Assuming direct control...

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Aloysius


Member

Posted Thu Dec 4th, 2008 4:21am Post subject: Episode 3
I liked the episode but there were several points of sadness. The soldier who comes home to find that the area he grew up in is like a war zone. The prison. The Mee Moua people -- although, sarahem, I am grateful to know a bit about their existence.

I haven't watched the other episodes yet. I hope to have more time at Xmas

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