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Canzonett


Member

Posted Sat Dec 9th, 2006 7:12pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
I knew it. I knew I would mess up some detail or other about those recipes trying to translate them.
The difficult and potentially disastrous factor in translating recipes is that it isn't enough to simply replace one term by its most probable sounding relative in the target tongue - you must actually "transculturate" the recipe and consider its whole kitchen-cultural background. Different countries, different units of measurement. Different tastes. Different ranges of food at the grocer's or in the supermarkets (if there are any, that is). While it is simply and plainly a basic implicitness that you can buy "rågsikt" at any Swedish grocery store, German grocers would just shake their heads until they fell off, twirling like a helicopter's rotor blades. Then there is "pudding", which can designate either a cake-like savoury mass or the creamy, sweet dessert stuff. It appears to be next to impossible to acquire wholemeal flour or bread in certain areas of this world.

And then there's vanillin sugar.

I must admit that I didn't bother to look it up in any dictionary. It seemed so natural to have the small packages labelled "Vanillinzucker" in the kitchen that I assumed it was called the same in English (being a mixture of 98% sugar and 2% vanillin, as it seems - i.e. vanilla extract). A short glance at my two standard online dictionaries lead me to "vanilla sugar", but this probably will not help you very much, either.

Just leave out the vanillin sugar thing. It won't hurt, I guess.

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jemmo


Member

Posted Sat Dec 9th, 2006 7:18pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanilla_sugar

"vanillin" I think, is the name for vanilla sugar offered by dr.oetker - one of germany's most influencing companies when it comes to cooking and baking.

there are even cooking and baking books by dr.oetker. Recipies in there sometimes read like this:

"how to make a chocolate-cherry-cake"?
- go buy dr. oetker's readymade-package "chocolate-cherry-cake"




X-D X-D X-D

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Canzonett


Member

Posted Sat Dec 9th, 2006 7:27pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
Nonononono. It's not just a brand name. Though you are basically right about Oetker's marketing techniques, Lovely Jane ... X-D


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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Sat Dec 9th, 2006 7:58pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
Canzonett´s right, the stuff is named after vanillin which is the main flavouring of the vanilla bean and which mostly is made synthetically since real vanillin extract is supposed to be very expensive. But I can imagine that Dr Oetker were the first to use the term 'Vanillin Zucker' which apparently stuck.

there are even cooking and baking books by dr.oetker. Recipies in there sometimes read like this:

"how to make a chocolate-cherry-cake"?
- go buy dr. oetker's readymade-package "chocolate-cherry-cake"
*rofl*

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jemmo


Member

Posted Sun Dec 10th, 2006 2:45pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
I've just Googled 'vanilla sugar' from UK sites and you CAN get it here - at some specialist food shops. I'll need to research more to find if you can get it in other main supermarkets.
One thing I DID come across, which is 'Quite Interesting' (to keep the Stephen theme alive) was this:

Top Tip - instead of buying expensive vanilla flavoured sugar from Posh Shops, simply buy a vanilla pod, stick it in a jar with a load of bog-standard sugar and leave for 48 hrs. Voila - loads of lovely vanilla sugar. Excellent in coffee (not so great in tea, but then sugar in tea should be illegal except in times of dire emergency) or in custard or scattered on fruit. Anything you'd use sugar for, really.

- picture of large glass jar with white sugar in it and a vanilla pod partly submerged in it -

(note: this jar is refilled with plain sugar about once a month, and has used the same vanilla pod for two years now. Sugar
still comes out very vanilla flavoured)

THAT seems pretty straightforward. I do so love and appreciate people's 'tips' taken from what works in real life. I might try the vanilla pod thing. I can get vanilla pods easily.
I should think it would be better to do this with fine sugar for baking purposes, rather than ordinary granulated sugar. It would probably be rather nice with icing sugar too.

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Canzonett


Member

Posted Tue Dec 12th, 2006 11:55pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
Just waiting for my little brother to send me the file with all of our Christmas recipes which I typed two years ago - it's still stored on his computer at home. Which is not connected to the internet. And which I had to use for typing the recipes since my mother refused to borrow me her handwritten collection. Most of them dating back to my grandmother, who had to cook and bake for a small host of people, a "family" in the old sense: Husband, five children, the nanny, all the farm helpers ... Unlike modern biscuit recipes, that tend to address single households and must be multiplied in order to achieve a satisfactory output, these ones must be divided by three or even four if you don't want to drown in cakes and have a very delicious, yet extremely unbalanced diet until Pentecost.

Listening to the Christmas Oratorio right now. Concert on Sunday, general rehearsal on Saturday, if anyone wants to be smuggled in and listen a bit, just drop me a PM.

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Herbi


Member

Posted Fri Feb 2nd, 2007 9:37am Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
oh, there is a cooking book, very nice, Here a small contribute from vienna

Sacher-cake
The tradition cake from Vienna



200 g butter or margarine (creamy)
200 g sugar
200 g flour
5 Eggs
6 EL Milk
4 EL cocoa powder
1 pckg vanillin sugar
3tsp baking powder

put all together in a bowle and mix it for about 10 Min, put it in a butterd springform pan

Preheat oven (180°C, Gas: 2-3). Bake for ca 50-60 min.
.
After the cake is cold, fill it with apricot Jam and coated the cake with chokolate
Serve it with whipped cream and a good cup of coffee

I wish the good succeed and good appetit

sorry my english is not so good, my german is better

http://www.canaries.co.uk/

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trouser material


Member

Posted Fri Feb 2nd, 2007 1:17pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
Yum yum in my tum.

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Herbi


Member

Posted Sat Feb 3rd, 2007 11:23am Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
AAAHHHHH, i`m so stopied, i cann`t upload a photo of a sacher-cake :-//

sorry my english is not so good, my german is better

http://www.canaries.co.uk/

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Sat Feb 3rd, 2007 5:54pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook

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Herbi


Member

Posted Sat Feb 3rd, 2007 6:28pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
Thank you Soupy Twist, this is exactly this foto which I wanted put on X-D X-D X-D X-D X-D X-D

sorry my english is not so good, my german is better

http://www.canaries.co.uk/

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Sat Feb 3rd, 2007 7:29pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
Thank you Soupy Twist, this is exactly this foto which I wanted put on X-D X-D X-D X-D X-D X-D

You´re welcome, Herbi

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joan


Member

Posted Sun Feb 4th, 2007 12:34pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
Just looked at this section for the first time. Vanilla essence is readily available most places and is used instead of the Vzucker. Once, when I lived in Vienna, we were to have some sort of super duper pudding with wonderful vanilla sauce. It sounded so exotic, but when we made it - it was just good old-fashioned English sponge pudding and custard.
Re Sacher Torte, I love the stuff, but here in Australia there is a wonderful cake, unromantically called mud cake. It is a good substitute for Sacher.
I still miss Austrian food though.....Kaiserschmarren, Topfen Palatschinken, Mohn Nudeln, Marillenknoedeln, and Gugelhupf (scrambled pancakes, curd pancakes, poppy seed noodles, apricot dumplings, and cake-with-things-in-made-in-a-tin-shaped-like-a-jellymold) . All disgustingly fattening of course.
I wonder if Vienna still rings with the sound of Schnitzel klopfen on a Sunday morning, as everyone beats their pork schnitzels into submission with a big schnitzel hammer?

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Sun Feb 4th, 2007 12:50pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
and cake-with-things-in-made-in-a-tin-shaped-like-a-jellymold

Just wanted to say how I love this translation:D Dictionaries translate 'Guglhupf' simply as 'ring cake' but yours is way lovelier

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joan


Member

Posted Sun Feb 4th, 2007 1:26pm Post subject: From Monsieur Anatole's Cookbook
Thank you kind sir.

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