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boffinbabe12


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 7:42pm Post subject: Fry voiceover for autism-friendly programme...
http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,,2039600,00.html

The story itself is worth a read... but if you can't be bothered:

A cartoon has been developed for autistic children, aimed to give such children practice in observing expressions and awakening in them the beginnings of empathy. It has taken actors faces and placed them on the front of transport vehicles in a Thomas the Tank Engine style manner. (Apparantly autistic children tend to love Thomas because it is systematic and logical.)

Anyway Stephen Fry will be narrating the episodes so if anyone here knows someone autistic or with an autistic child or whatever- just letting you know!

I'm starting to think that this may be a pointless post... but OH WELL!

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 7:53pm Post subject: Fry voiceover for autism-friendly programme...
Oh wow I'm glad to hear that someone's making a program for autistic children. This is an area that really interests me (Special Educational Needs I mean) so I'll be interested to find out if it works. I hope it's successful.

Baron-Cohen is not advancing the Transporters as a "cure" - unrealistic and, in any case, he also recognises the strengths and talents that autism confers. But he wants his project to help such children understand the aspects of life they find most baffling. One parent whose son took part in the trials of the DVD said, "We have noticed a change in his behaviour, speech and range of emotional expressions - it's a bit like someone's flicked a switch in his head".

^^^ I think this is a very important point. Nothing happens overnight, there are no quick cures. It'll probably happen at different rates with the children watching as there are so many factors involved in how quickly they learn and develop. Anything that can capture their attention and help them however great or little is a good thing and it's certainly better than nothing.

Assuming direct control...

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boffinbabe12


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 7:55pm Post subject: Fry voiceover for autism-friendly programme...
And Stephen Fry will make sure that whilst they build their communication skill, they build them in correct english.

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 8:06pm Post subject: Fry voiceover for autism-friendly programme...
That too. He's got a lovely voice for narration. We all know how well he did narrating Pocoyo and obviously other people feel the same way and that's why he's doing this.

Assuming direct control...

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Gertrude Susanne


Member

Posted Sun Mar 25th, 2007 12:41pm Post subject: Fry voiceover for autism-friendly programme...
Pointless post - oh, not at all!
I read that article too and was quite impressed. I have never met an autistic person in all my life (I have met someone who told me what it is like to be in a coma...) but it must be devastating for parents not to be able to "get through" to their own children. Let´s hope the fifteen 5-minute episodes will produce the results hoped for. Lives may be changed as a result.
They described Mr Fry´s voice as "sonorous". I think "best voice for narration ever" - based on amyl_nitrate´s post - would be more appropriate.

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Sun Mar 25th, 2007 3:51pm Post subject: Fry voiceover for autism-friendly programme...
Pointless post - oh, not at all!
I read that article too and was quite impressed. I have never met an autistic person in all my life (I have met someone who told me what it is like to be in a coma...) but it must be devastating for parents not to be able to "get through" to their own children. Let´s hope the fifteen 5-minute episodes will produce the results hoped for. Lives may be changed as a result.
They described Mr Fry´s voice as "sonorous". I think "best voice for narration ever" - based on amyl_nitrate´s post - would be more appropriate.

I've worked with a lot of children with autism, asperger's syndrome and other disabilities/learning difficulties so I know what it's like not being able to get through sometimes. There's a lot of things in social communication that they struggle with like eye contact, turn taking, listening to what you're saying (and really listening because I've met one or two who just pick out key words that you say and start talking about something related to that word that doesn't relate to what you're really saying). Then you get those children who have built up these habits where they repeat the question you've just asked them before asnwering the question (I've heard of one guy who would always repeat the question three times exactly to himself before answering). The severity varies from individual to individual which means while something like a technique or teaching method may work for one child it doesn't for another. It can be a tough job working with children with disabilities and/or learning difficulties but it can very rewarding, fulfilling and fun as well. You start to realise there are a lot of things we all take for granted that some people just can't do or struggle with a lot.

Assuming direct control...

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