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Willdew


Member

Posted Sun Mar 16th, 2008 11:35pm Post subject: Making History
I'm Canadian and my family has been in North America for three generations. It's odd though, the difference in the way that my parents and grandparents were raised to view the nature of citizenship--as if we are all subjects of the British Empire, and we have the misfortune to live somewhere that is a long ways off, peripheral, not exactly *real.* And although the Canadian school system had changed a great deal by the time my brother and I enrolled, as an English Lit student I often feel as if I don't live where everything important that I am reading about has happened. I can't quite place it, but sometimes, yes, I do wonder what life would have been like if I'd been born in the UK. (Which of course doesn't make any sense whatsoever, because if my grandparents on either my mother or father's side hadn't met up here, I wouldn't exist.)

I suppose... Making History to me was more about the "supra-natural forces of history" theory (i.e. socio-economic forces cause war to happen) vs. the "Great Man" theory (i.e. key historical figures cause war to happen.) Also, for some reason the scene where the main character realizes with his girlfriend gone he can urinate in the kitchen sink really stands out.

I should probably read this book again. It's been years, and I was a lot younger when I first got it as a present. (My mother literally handed it to me and said, "here, Jeeves wrote a book.") I would probably have something er, deeper to say if I reread it now.

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Midsomerlover


Member

Posted Tue Mar 18th, 2008 5:31pm Post subject: Making History
I am reading this book right now and it's definately the best so far. In my opinion it's a real pageturner, and I hope that someday someone is skilled and smart enough to adapt this masterpiece into a movie.


@midsomerlover on Twitter.

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exoskeleton


Member

Posted Sat Jun 13th, 2009 3:25pm Post subject: Making History
I'm reading this now, a bit of 200 pages into it. overall I am enjoying it completely. these are just some minor comments. I'll write more when I'm finished.
I'm kind of tickled because I visited Princeton when I was looking at colleges (because of parental insistance; never wanted to attend, never applied.) I have seen the sights they describe, and walked on Nassau Street, seen the gate you're not supposed to exit, been in Clio Hall (that's where the admissions office is now, actually.) in addition to knowing the history of the school, I had read other fiction set a Princeton, so I was more of a tourist than a prospective student through the whole tour.
the trouble is that I thought it was really pretty, and then to be reminded it looks goofy compared to actual old universities in Europe is a bit disappointing.

I also can't understand where that Taylor man gets the idea that Americans don't say things are "named after" someone. because we do. granted, we also used "named for," so there is a difference, but it's that we sometimes say "for," not that we never use "after."

sockdolager.

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exoskeleton


Member

Posted Mon Jun 15th, 2009 4:58am Post subject: Making History
I realized that I didn't actually answer the questions original proposed for this thread when I wrote my last post.
I don't really have much to think about, because my ancestors really haven't gone anywhere in so long, my family doesn't exist outside of America. I live near to where everyone has lived for so many generations, it must go back well past the Civil War. I have examined one family tree, and only a few branches along the way came from anywhere in Europe. most just fade out still in America. so,. if any one of those unknown genetic players hadn't decided the Atlantic was worth it, I wouldn't exist.

btw, this book, *fans self*, so exciting. I keep reading a bit, and then I have to get up and walk around a little or distract myself because I'm enthusiastic about it I can't actually read any more.

sockdolager.

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gemini


Member

Posted Thu Nov 12th, 2009 5:17pm Post subject: Making History

Like someone else here already wrote, it took me also only four days to read the book. And I think that says a great deal about the quality of it. It covers parts of history I'm interested in (World Wars I+II), time traveling (I enjoyed Stephen'st theory although I believe in the so called Grandfather paradox) and of course the story of Michael and Steve is really touching.
And for the original question asked at the beginning of this topic: My ancestors lived in this area for over 500 years now (that's as far as I can track them) so the question of what I would have become if they hadn't moved never really arose at least not for me. But where you get born and what nationality you become is just all a great coincidence, that's why I think being proud of ones nationality and therefore feeling superior to others is just plain stupid!

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kalawailer


Member

Posted Sun Jan 31st, 2010 4:16am Post subject: Making History

I absolutely love this book. I read it a long time ago, when I turned 14/15 my mum let me loose on her bookshelf and I took stacks and stacks of them to my room. I knew Stephen Fry from Blackadder and Jeeves and Wooster so was very pleasantly surprised to find that he was a writer aswell. I told everyone about the book, how amazing it was and that they had to read it, unfortunately I think I bored my friends and they never did. I went on to read The Liar which I think I would have loved had I not read Making History first. It may have been the first proper book I ever read and it was so thought provoking it almost ruined all other books for me. Luckily not completely, I still love reading. I just tend to compare them to Making History. I really do. It's one of my life missions to recommend people see the musical RENT and read Making History.


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DalekJamie


Member

Posted Wed Jun 23rd, 2010 5:56pm Post subject: Making History

Im reading this book at the moment and I think its really cool. Just started it and seriously cant put it down. Its immensely engaging. Thank you, Mr Fry


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Stepherweps


Member

Posted Mon Jul 5th, 2010 11:21pm Post subject: Making History

This is the first one of Stephen's novels which I have read, I've read Moab, one of the QI books (not by him as such), and the companion book to Stephen Fry in America, but I have to say I absolutely adored every minute of it! I found it very difficult to put down (which is always a good thing)! Being a history undergrad I found it of particular appeal, it was really thought provoking, it reallly made me think, how one small thing, done differently could change the whole course of history. The book as a whole was fabulous, so well written! Well done Mr Fry, full marks for your skills as an author.

Seeing as Making History is finished, now onto The Liar.

Steph.

If you are a tweeter, and wanna follow me, I'm @Stepherweps on twitter.

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olivertWisted


Member

Posted Wed Jul 14th, 2010 4:04pm Post subject: Making History

What is this book - boring remake of blissful 'Back to the future'? & last Tarantino's film is boring remake to Fry's boring remake?

This is your home now, Joe.

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Peachy


Member

Posted Wed Jul 28th, 2010 12:00am Post subject: Making History

read the book in 2 days I really couldn't put it down thank goodness I'd finished all my coursework and stuff in english because my brillant english teacher who left at the end of this term sadly said that since I was the only one who had finished all the work I could read my book which was the last few chapters of making history (I'd read almost all of it on the sunday) and it made me really cheery and giddy for the rest of the day (more than I have been in a long time) when I finished it because it was that fantabbydoozy one of my fave books of all time infact I might read it again now

We judge ourselves by our ability to make a difference. Not noisily or with sanctimonious complacency, but deep inside, in that still small place where we really talk to ourselves - Stephen Fry
my twitter @peachytweety
:) :) xx

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Peachy


Member

Posted Wed Jul 28th, 2010 12:05am Post subject: Making History

I adore the Michael and Steve love story It really brightened my day when I got to the end of the book and they were together soooooooooooo sweet!!

We judge ourselves by our ability to make a difference. Not noisily or with sanctimonious complacency, but deep inside, in that still small place where we really talk to ourselves - Stephen Fry
my twitter @peachytweety
:) :) xx

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llinsigharei


Member

Posted Fri Jul 30th, 2010 12:40pm Post subject: Making History

I know I am. I can't wait to vote for the first Republican women VP and against the first half black candidate for President.

Revolution E-Cigarette


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AC


Member

Posted Wed Aug 4th, 2010 5:10pm Post subject: Making History

Just finished reading Making History. There were a few tidbits about American culture in there that were wrong--2 different years are listed for Nixon's resignation on the same page, the Yankees' colors are blue and white (not black and white), and the Brooklyn Dodgers have been the Los Angeles Dodgers since 1958. Also, people in America do say that something/someone is "named after" someone or something else. Maybe since this was all said in some kind of alternate world it doesn't matter, but as an American some of this stuff made me pause while reading and go, "Wait a minute!" I also thought that certain aspects of the story could've been developed further, such as the illegality of homosexuality in the alternate world and more details about Gloder's rule over Germany/Europe.

Having said all that, I really did enjoy this book tremendously. It was a terrific page-turner with some very clever twists, thought-provoking questions and ideas, and truly laugh-out-loud moments. The writing, as usual for Stephen Fry, was top-notch--very intelligent and very entertaining to read. While I wouldn't say that everything about this book was perfect, it was excellent and I'd definitely recommend it.

"Ordinary riches can be stolen, real riches cannot. In your soul are infinitely precious things that cannot be taken from you." -Oscar Wilde

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AC


Member

Posted Wed Aug 11th, 2010 5:39pm Post subject: Making History

Having thought about it and discussed it with others, the Dodgers never leaving Brooklyn makes sense in the world Michael Young finds himself in. However, I'd still love to know where some of the other details I found questionable came from. I assume they must have had some purpose.

"Ordinary riches can be stolen, real riches cannot. In your soul are infinitely precious things that cannot be taken from you." -Oscar Wilde

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Evelien


Member

Posted Sun Oct 10th, 2010 5:38pm Post subject: Making History

Thank you very much for this book, Mr Fry. This is truely a brilliant 'Meisterwerk' you wrote there! I nearly finished the book and I'm so excited to know the ending.
I had a great time reading it (in the park, at school, at home, in the train,...). The thing is, I have to read it again, because I didn't understand everything very well. I'm not English, but thanks to the good (and sometimes funny) formulation I can understand the most of it!
"Stephen Fry in America" and "The Fry Chronicles" are waiting on my desk to be read.

100% infected by the Stephen Fry-virus

Follow Me on Twitter: @evevandoninck

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