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Aoibheann


Member

Posted Tue May 22nd, 2007 4:56pm Post subject: Me, the inventor...
Hahahahaha.. slaaaaaaag? who? moi? how very dare you.. who dear? me dear? gay dear? no dear? ..........

oh shite... im doing it again... :-//

i will admitt tho that i didnt realise it was his stuff.. knew i had hear it somewhere before.... haha.. popped my ass over to you tube.. bow down for you tube!!!!!!!

Sowwy. im going to be gracious and hail Mr Ed Byrne...

Clicky

Back off Cockney!!!!

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trouser material


Member

Posted Tue May 22nd, 2007 8:02pm Post subject: Me, the inventor...
hahaha.. ironic? eww.. american word.. dont like it..

i did adore Alanis Morsette at one time.. but i realised that song 'ironic' isnt irony at all.. its just plan bad luck.... 'ten thousands spoons when all you need is a knife?'... and 'a no smoking sign on your cigarette break'.... and 'a traffic jam when your already late'.....

pure bad luck to me.. must have killed something in a previous life...
American word? Becuase it was used wrongly by a Canadian singer? What the fuck?

I read a book ages ago that went through the word 'irony'... it was very funny and very true.... it talked about how irony is an American idea... about how when it comes down to it... there is no real meaning to the word....its one of those non words.. and that its an American word because Europeans dont have an Ironic bone in their body.... it was very funny and it broke down the word completely.... but i fear im not explaining it very well... :-//

i·ro·ny1 /ˈaɪrəni, ˈaɪər-/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[ahy-ruh-nee, ahy-er-] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun, plural -nies. 1. the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning: the irony of her reply, “How nice!” when I said I had to work all weekend.
2. Literature. a. a technique of indicating, as through character or plot development, an intention or attitude opposite to that which is actually or ostensibly stated.
b. (esp. in contemporary writing) a manner of organizing a work so as to give full expression to contradictory or complementary impulses, attitudes, etc., esp. as a means of indicating detachment from a subject, theme, or emotion.

3. Socratic irony.
4. dramatic irony.
5. an outcome of events contrary to what was, or might have been, expected.
6. the incongruity of this.
7. an objectively sardonic style of speech or writing.
8. an objectively or humorously sardonic utterance, disposition, quality, etc.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[Origin: 1495–1505; < L īrōnīa < Gk eirōneía dissimulation, sarcasm, understatement, equiv. to eírōn a dissembler + -eia -y3]


—Synonyms 1, 2. Irony, sarcasm, satire indicate mockery of something or someone. The essential feature of irony is the indirect presentation of a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. In the figure of speech, emphasis is placed on the opposition between the literal and intended meaning of a statement; one thing is said and its opposite implied, as in the comment, “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” made when it is raining or nasty. Ironic literature exploits, in addition to the rhetorical figure, such devices as character development, situation, and plot to stress the paradoxical nature of reality or the contrast between an ideal and actual condition, set of circumstances, etc., frequently in such a way as to stress the absurdity present in the contradiction between substance and form. Irony differs from sarcasm in greater subtlety and wit. In sarcasm ridicule or mockery is used harshly, often crudely and contemptuously, for destructive purposes. It may be used in an indirect manner, and have the form of irony, as in “What a fine musician you turned out to be!” or it may be used in the form of a direct statement, “You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants.” The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal inflection, whereas satire and irony, arising originally as literary and rhetorical forms, are exhibited in the organization or structuring of either language or literary material. Satire usually implies the use of irony or sarcasm for censorious or critical purposes and is often directed at public figures or institutions, conventional behavior, political situations, etc.

I'm not interested in what an American does or doesn't think irony is.

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Aoibheann


Member

Posted Tue May 22nd, 2007 8:24pm Post subject: Me, the inventor...
hahaha.. ironic? eww.. american word.. dont like it..

i did adore Alanis Morsette at one time.. but i realised that song 'ironic' isnt irony at all.. its just plan bad luck.... 'ten thousands spoons when all you need is a knife?'... and 'a no smoking sign on your cigarette break'.... and 'a traffic jam when your already late'.....

pure bad luck to me.. must have killed something in a previous life...
American word? Becuase it was used wrongly by a Canadian singer? What the fuck?

I read a book ages ago that went through the word 'irony'... it was very funny and very true.... it talked about how irony is an American idea... about how when it comes down to it... there is no real meaning to the word....its one of those non words.. and that its an American word because Europeans dont have an Ironic bone in their body.... it was very funny and it broke down the word completely.... but i fear im not explaining it very well... :-//

i·ro·ny1 /ˈaɪrəni, ˈaɪər-/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[ahy-ruh-nee, ahy-er-] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun, plural -nies. 1. the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning: the irony of her reply, “How nice!” when I said I had to work all weekend.
2. Literature. a. a technique of indicating, as through character or plot development, an intention or attitude opposite to that which is actually or ostensibly stated.
b. (esp. in contemporary writing) a manner of organizing a work so as to give full expression to contradictory or complementary impulses, attitudes, etc., esp. as a means of indicating detachment from a subject, theme, or emotion.

3. Socratic irony.
4. dramatic irony.
5. an outcome of events contrary to what was, or might have been, expected.
6. the incongruity of this.
7. an objectively sardonic style of speech or writing.
8. an objectively or humorously sardonic utterance, disposition, quality, etc.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[Origin: 1495–1505; < L īrōnīa < Gk eirōneía dissimulation, sarcasm, understatement, equiv. to eírōn a dissembler + -eia -y3]


—Synonyms 1, 2. Irony, sarcasm, satire indicate mockery of something or someone. The essential feature of irony is the indirect presentation of a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. In the figure of speech, emphasis is placed on the opposition between the literal and intended meaning of a statement; one thing is said and its opposite implied, as in the comment, “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” made when it is raining or nasty. Ironic literature exploits, in addition to the rhetorical figure, such devices as character development, situation, and plot to stress the paradoxical nature of reality or the contrast between an ideal and actual condition, set of circumstances, etc., frequently in such a way as to stress the absurdity present in the contradiction between substance and form. Irony differs from sarcasm in greater subtlety and wit. In sarcasm ridicule or mockery is used harshly, often crudely and contemptuously, for destructive purposes. It may be used in an indirect manner, and have the form of irony, as in “What a fine musician you turned out to be!” or it may be used in the form of a direct statement, “You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants.” The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal inflection, whereas satire and irony, arising originally as literary and rhetorical forms, are exhibited in the organization or structuring of either language or literary material. Satire usually implies the use of irony or sarcasm for censorious or critical purposes and is often directed at public figures or institutions, conventional behavior, political situations, etc.

I'm not interested in what an American does or doesn't think irony is.

you feel better now trousers love? got that out of your system?

im not interested in what an American does or doesnt think irony is... im not armerican and the thing i was refering to wasnt to do with what an American thinks of irony.. it was to with the use of the word. you see?

just step back from this a bit and see how funny it all is trousers..

i dont like the word irony... and think it is a funny kind of word.. and was relating it to something i read once... its like that thread 'words'.. just like i dont like the word 'moist' *eugh* ... just imparting some thoughts with ya'll.

just like Mr Fry not liking Corriander... one of those personal opinions....

were you trying to prove some kind of point there.?... not sure what you were feeling when you did...

and you went quoting the dictionary... because to me.. the word 'irony' seems like a non word.. thats funny.. step back and look at it love.. take whatever your carrying into this out of the equasion.. see it now? its all mad when you step back from it...

i was having some light hearted fun and you come trundeling in with your heavy boots on.... tis ok tho.... everyone does it. i have my anger under check.... and im learning to step back from things.. cut it off at the root.... you know?... i just want people to be gentle with each other... the world needs more gentleness... and im feeling... not optimistic.. but.. hippish. .. so your not going to provoke a silly little out burst out of me.. keep ploughing tho love. have fun....

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Aoibheann


Member

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 4:28pm Post subject: Me, the inventor...
i once invented a gorgeous cheesecake... but i didnt write down the recipie...
well it was me and my sister.. i just threw things into the bowl..

ohhh... and im not sure if my mam invented it.. dont think she did.. but celery and apple in natural yougurt is very yumyum.

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 4:51pm Post subject: Me, the inventor...
I detest stereotyping especially if it's tired old lame arguments like Americans are dumb and don't understand irony (whereas the good-old British invented it). Bollocks.
If Americans don't get irony, why is The Simpsons so popular?
If the British are masters of irony, why did Brasseye offend?

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Aoibheann


Member

Posted Wed May 23rd, 2007 5:00pm Post subject: Me, the inventor...
The article thingy i read was more taking the piss out of it.. you know? was a light hearted thingy. funny stuff.. wasnt ment to cause offence...

spose the short answer is...

Who knows Nick.. who knows..

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