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Maren


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 7:30pm Post subject: My dog just died
How sad.
Once someone told me: contrary to a person a dog is remunerable. Complete rubbish because every dog is not just an individual but a friend.
Zak surely was a true friend and you will always remember the good times with him.
I'm really very sorry.

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 7:36pm Post subject: My dog just died
How sad.
Once someone told me: contrary to a person a dog is remunerable. Complete rubbish because every dog is not just an individual but a friend.
Zak surely was a true friend and you will always remember the good times with him.
I'm really very sorry.

That's right. It's horrible to lose a pet because they are the best and truest friends and companions, each with their own personality. Again, I'm very sorry and hope your dad is ok.

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Desdemona


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 7:48pm Post subject: My dog just died
Darling, Im so sorry.
too loose a pet is so hard, remember we are all here for you.
XxX

Skip Life and come with me?

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amberzak


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 9:03pm Post subject: My dog just died
Thanks everyone.

I haven't seen my dad that upset since the funeral of my step brother last year. I didn't know what to do, I just held him and hugged him.

I feel like I am in shock. I keep thinking about Zak. When we first got him (my parents were still together) he sat in my hand. He was a german shepard btw. He was so small, but he had the biggest paws for a puppy.

I trained him to be able to get things for my step brother (who was in a wheelchair), so he knew things like what the TV controller was, or phone, or brush. And he would pick it up in his mouth and pass it to my step brother.

He was never really the same after Jamie died though.

My dad is devistated, as you can imagine. I wish I could do more for him, I really do.

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IdeaCollector


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 9:20pm Post subject: My dog just died
*hugs* Amberzak so sorry to hear about the loss of your dear doggie.

I used to be EternalStudent on these forums until the switch over. So don't get excited..I'm not someone new and exciting. I'm just me :P

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ysabella


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 10:24pm Post subject: My dog just died
Aw, I'm sorry, honey.

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phymonarg


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 11:06pm Post subject: My dog just died
Very sad for you and your dad. And poor Zak.
It's dreadful when a beloved animal dies and your'e not there for the last moments.

It happened to my Sammy, a scruffy 12.5 year old madcap mongrel. My buddy. Slept on my bed and messed up my, well, just about everything. But I still loved him, yet he died at the vet's surgery after they kept him in for obsevation. I'd never left him alone before, he'd never not been on the foot of my bed one single night. I was devastated that I'd let him die without me. :'(

So I do understand something of what you are feeling Holly. My thoughts are with you and your dad.

Pete.

I think that I shall never see, an elephant in a rhubarb tree. (S Milligan)

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sniffles


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 11:25pm Post subject: My dog just died
I'm so sad for you.

Here's a poem that James Stewart once dedicated to his dog:

Beau

He never came to me when I would call
Unless I had a tennis ball,
Or he felt like it,
But mostly he didn't come at all.

When he was young
He never learned to heel
Or sit or stay,
He did things his way.

Discipline was not his bag
But when you were with him things sure didn't drag.
He'd dig up a rosebush just to spite me,
And when I'd grab him, he'd turn and bite me.

He bit lots of folks from day to day,
The delivery boy was his favorite prey.
The gas man wouldn't read our meter,
He said we owned a real man-eater.

He set the house on fire
But the story's long to tell.
Suffice it to say that he survived
And the house survived as well.

On the evening walks, and Gloria took him,
He was always first out the door.
The Old One and I brought up the rear
Because our bones were sore.

He would charge up the street with Mom hanging on,
What a beautiful pair they were!
And if it was still light and the tourists were out,
They created a bit of a stir.

But every once in a while, he would stop in his tracks
And with a frown on his face look around.
It was just to make sure that the Old One was there
And would follow him where he was bound.

We are early-to-bedders at our house--
I guess I'm the first to retire.
And as I'd leave the room he'd look at me
And get up from his place by the fire.

He knew where the tennis balls were upstairs,
And I'd give him one for a while.
He would push it under the bed with his nose
And I'd fish it out with a smile.

And before very long
He'd tire of the ball
And be asleep in his corner
In no time at all.

And there were nights when I'd feel him
Climb upon our bed
And lie between us,
And I'd pat his head.

And there were nights when I'd feel this stare
And I'd wake up and he'd be sitting there
And I reach out my hand and stroke his hair.
And sometimes I'd feel him sigh
and I think I know the reason why.

He would wake up at night
And he would have this fear
Of the dark, of life, of lots of things,
And he'd be glad to have me near.

And now he's dead.
And there are nights when I think I feel him
Climb upon our bed and lie between us,
And I pat his head.

And there are nights when I think
I feel that stare
And I reach out my hand to stroke his hair,
But he's not there.

Oh, how I wish that wasn't so,
I'll always love a dog named Beau.

--

taken from Jimmy Stewart and His Poems by Jimmy Stewart, a short collection of poems published by Crown Publishers, Inc. in 1989.

And here's the story behind Beau (it's very touching):

"When I was a kid I had a dog named Bounce. As I remember, he followed me home from school one day. Nobody in town claimed him, and my father said I could keep him.
Bounce wasn’t allowed in the house very much, so my father helped me build a little house for him out in the backyard. The dog seemed to like that fine.
The next summer, while I was at Scout camp, Bounce was killed. My family didn’t tell me about it until I got home, and I cried. I missed Bounce. For some reason I didn’t look around for another dog. Maybe it was because of all the other things that where happening: school, and the Boy Scouts, and working in my father’s store. It was a sort of a busy time.
As time went on – with prep school and getting into college (that was a close call) – I just didn’t give much thought to dogs; although I did remember the good days with Bounce every once in a while.
Then, after college and my time on the New York stage, and my first years in Hollywood, I didn’t seem to have time for a dog. Then came the war, and I don’t remember even seeing a dog for those four years. After the war and working to get started back in the movies, I had my hands full.
Then I married Gloria, and a whole lot of changes took place. When I married her, Gloria had a fine German shepherd that she was devoted to. His name was Bello. His complete devotion to Gloria was a wonderful thing to see. Bello, more or less, just put up with me for a while. Slowly, though, we got to know each other and things were fine.
Gloria taught me something I’d never known. That is, that you don’t just have to have a dog around as a pet or a watchdog. You and the dog can become friends.
Bello became part of the family. He lived to a ripe old age, and we all were sad when he died. Gloria had another shepherd picked out, so after Bello came Pax – a fine young German shepherd. We all liked him, and he fit into the family very well. But Pax started having health problems soon after he arrived, and in a matter of four months we lost him.
In our search for another dog, Gloria decided on a change of breed. Although I think she will always love the German shepherd most, she brought a golden retriever into the family. His name was Simba and he made a hit with all of us. Simba was a very quiet, well-behaved dog. But we all felt that it would be good for him to have a companion. So along came a ten-month-old golden retriever named Beau.
Beau was a fine-looking young pup, but we soon find out we had a problem. Beau was on the wild side. He tried to bite holes in furniture. He dug huge holes in our lawn. When our neighbor knocked a tennis ball into our yard, he would go after the ball and bury it. Then, two days later he would dig it up and eat it. He bit people, including me. We all tried to calm him down, but he had his own ideas.
Through all this, I found myself getting closer to Beau for some reason. Maybe it was because after he had torn a hole in a sofa he would come to me to apologize. And through it all Beau and I became friends. After about a year, Beau quieted down a lot and we became better friends than ever.
Then it happened, I was making a picture on location in Arizona, and one night our veterinarian, Dr. Keagy, called me and told me that Beau was very sick and he was afraid he couldn’t save him. I got the next two days off and flew home. Gloria and the kids were very quiet, and even Simba – who was now called „the old one“ – seemed to be worried.
I went down to Dr. Keagy’s office, and when I saw Beau I don’t think he recognized me. He seemed to have trouble breathing. Dr. Keagy said he was in pain. After some time with him, I decided to take the doctor’s advice and have Beau put to sleep.
I could hardly see to drive home because of the tears in my eyes, but I decided right then and there that I would write about my friend Beau and try to make it rhyme. It came out like this." ...

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amberzak


Member

Posted Tue Nov 18th, 2008 11:36pm Post subject: My dog just died
I'm so sad for you.

Here's a poem that James Stewart once dedicated to his dog:

Beau

He never came to me when I would call
Unless I had a tennis ball,
Or he felt like it,
But mostly he didn't come at all.

When he was young
He never learned to heel
Or sit or stay,
He did things his way.

Discipline was not his bag
But when you were with him things sure didn't drag.
He'd dig up a rosebush just to spite me,
And when I'd grab him, he'd turn and bite me.

He bit lots of folks from day to day,
The delivery boy was his favorite prey.
The gas man wouldn't read our meter,
He said we owned a real man-eater.

He set the house on fire
But the story's long to tell.
Suffice it to say that he survived
And the house survived as well.

On the evening walks, and Gloria took him,
He was always first out the door.
The Old One and I brought up the rear
Because our bones were sore.

He would charge up the street with Mom hanging on,
What a beautiful pair they were!
And if it was still light and the tourists were out,
They created a bit of a stir.

But every once in a while, he would stop in his tracks
And with a frown on his face look around.
It was just to make sure that the Old One was there
And would follow him where he was bound.

We are early-to-bedders at our house--
I guess I'm the first to retire.
And as I'd leave the room he'd look at me
And get up from his place by the fire.

He knew where the tennis balls were upstairs,
And I'd give him one for a while.
He would push it under the bed with his nose
And I'd fish it out with a smile.

And before very long
He'd tire of the ball
And be asleep in his corner
In no time at all.

And there were nights when I'd feel him
Climb upon our bed
And lie between us,
And I'd pat his head.

And there were nights when I'd feel this stare
And I'd wake up and he'd be sitting there
And I reach out my hand and stroke his hair.
And sometimes I'd feel him sigh
and I think I know the reason why.

He would wake up at night
And he would have this fear
Of the dark, of life, of lots of things,
And he'd be glad to have me near.

And now he's dead.
And there are nights when I think I feel him
Climb upon our bed and lie between us,
And I pat his head.

And there are nights when I think
I feel that stare
And I reach out my hand to stroke his hair,
But he's not there.

Oh, how I wish that wasn't so,
I'll always love a dog named Beau.

--

taken from Jimmy Stewart and His Poems by Jimmy Stewart, a short collection of poems published by Crown Publishers, Inc. in 1989.

And here's the story behind Beau (it's very touching):

"When I was a kid I had a dog named Bounce. As I remember, he followed me home from school one day. Nobody in town claimed him, and my father said I could keep him.
Bounce wasn’t allowed in the house very much, so my father helped me build a little house for him out in the backyard. The dog seemed to like that fine.
The next summer, while I was at Scout camp, Bounce was killed. My family didn’t tell me about it until I got home, and I cried. I missed Bounce. For some reason I didn’t look around for another dog. Maybe it was because of all the other things that where happening: school, and the Boy Scouts, and working in my father’s store. It was a sort of a busy time.
As time went on – with prep school and getting into college (that was a close call) – I just didn’t give much thought to dogs; although I did remember the good days with Bounce every once in a while.
Then, after college and my time on the New York stage, and my first years in Hollywood, I didn’t seem to have time for a dog. Then came the war, and I don’t remember even seeing a dog for those four years. After the war and working to get started back in the movies, I had my hands full.
Then I married Gloria, and a whole lot of changes took place. When I married her, Gloria had a fine German shepherd that she was devoted to. His name was Bello. His complete devotion to Gloria was a wonderful thing to see. Bello, more or less, just put up with me for a while. Slowly, though, we got to know each other and things were fine.
Gloria taught me something I’d never known. That is, that you don’t just have to have a dog around as a pet or a watchdog. You and the dog can become friends.
Bello became part of the family. He lived to a ripe old age, and we all were sad when he died. Gloria had another shepherd picked out, so after Bello came Pax – a fine young German shepherd. We all liked him, and he fit into the family very well. But Pax started having health problems soon after he arrived, and in a matter of four months we lost him.
In our search for another dog, Gloria decided on a change of breed. Although I think she will always love the German shepherd most, she brought a golden retriever into the family. His name was Simba and he made a hit with all of us. Simba was a very quiet, well-behaved dog. But we all felt that it would be good for him to have a companion. So along came a ten-month-old golden retriever named Beau.
Beau was a fine-looking young pup, but we soon find out we had a problem. Beau was on the wild side. He tried to bite holes in furniture. He dug huge holes in our lawn. When our neighbor knocked a tennis ball into our yard, he would go after the ball and bury it. Then, two days later he would dig it up and eat it. He bit people, including me. We all tried to calm him down, but he had his own ideas.
Through all this, I found myself getting closer to Beau for some reason. Maybe it was because after he had torn a hole in a sofa he would come to me to apologize. And through it all Beau and I became friends. After about a year, Beau quieted down a lot and we became better friends than ever.
Then it happened, I was making a picture on location in Arizona, and one night our veterinarian, Dr. Keagy, called me and told me that Beau was very sick and he was afraid he couldn’t save him. I got the next two days off and flew home. Gloria and the kids were very quiet, and even Simba – who was now called „the old one“ – seemed to be worried.
I went down to Dr. Keagy’s office, and when I saw Beau I don’t think he recognized me. He seemed to have trouble breathing. Dr. Keagy said he was in pain. After some time with him, I decided to take the doctor’s advice and have Beau put to sleep.
I could hardly see to drive home because of the tears in my eyes, but I decided right then and there that I would write about my friend Beau and try to make it rhyme. It came out like this." ...

I think I have read this one. Thanks.

I think I am going to write Zak a poem tomorrow. If I manage it I will post it on here.

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WhyGenTom


Member

Posted Wed Nov 19th, 2008 6:01am Post subject: My dog just died
Hope you're dealing ok. I lost my dog last September (he was my childhood pet), 16 years old and he was a sprightly little thing up until his final months... I know it's a horrible thing, and even though they can be such foolish creatures they always love you back.

Take care and never forget =]

xx

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