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monochromeprincess


Member

Posted Thu Feb 26th, 2009 8:20pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
You know a little while ago they were asking for questions about LCTS on the website? Well mine got answered. I'm not sure if it's been published, because when I try to take the link it doesn't work. But try this:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/lastchancetosee/sites/about/qanda/

List of questions:

Kakapos and other animals - Adrian Camp
How do you think the situation has changed for the animals that Douglas and Mark went in search of for the original project? I am particularly interested in news of kakapo numbers.

Mad as balloons - Steph Thelwell
I wonder what might Darwin say if he were here today to comment on the rate of extinction. Would he work to preserve species or would he think our expansion into, and invasion of, these delicate environments a natural part of the greater map of evolution? Or would he think us all as mad as balloons?

Rhinos and spectacled bears - Charles Kinsey
Did you get up close and touch a wild rhino? Are you going to include any bears in the series? I guess probably not as Stephen made that great film recently about the spectacled bear.

Dedicated conservationists - Rob Dolton
In the original book and radio series you met many wonderful people who were battling to save endangered animals. On your recent travels, have you come across the same people still doing their best to save the same animals? Were you able to swim with the Amazonian manatees? If so, were they as friendly as their Florida cousins?

Old school versus digital technology - Marian Goody
What is more important in saving endangered wildlife these days - the offshoot of twig technology (paper) or the chip?

and MINE!!!:

Man and nature - Debra from Bristol
What do you think is the main reason for the extinction of animals? Is it mankind's predisposition to not nurture nature or a greater emphasis being placed on charity towards human suffering?

Let me know if anyone can't see it and I'll transcribe.

much love

mp xxx

@dreamingshadow

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PamJH


Member

Posted Thu Feb 26th, 2009 9:09pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
Hey, great you got an answer.

I can't view the video (not available in my area). If you have time to transcribe, that's great, but don't knock yourself out. You've been doing a lot for us lately.

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ginj


Member *

Posted Thu Feb 26th, 2009 9:10pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
I clicked on Stephen's picture with your question, but it said "not available in your area." I guess it's because I am in the US. But still, very exciting! Congratulations.

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gadgetgirl


Member

Posted Fri Feb 27th, 2009 1:06pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
Oooh, you really got them thinking didn't you MP?

That would be me.

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Soph


Member

Posted Fri Feb 27th, 2009 1:29pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
Aw wow, getting a response like that, pretty special, mp.
Great question - You kept them interested and talking for the longest. : ]

Photobucket

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monochromeprincess


Member

Posted Fri Feb 27th, 2009 2:20pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
*giggles* I know. How cool. Mine was like four minutes long with several breaks for editing whereas the rest were like two minutes. YEY!

Here's the transcript of mine, I'll do the rest if I get round to it.

Man and nature



S: “What have you found or what do you think is the main reason for the extinction of animals?” (small laugh) “Is it mankind's predisposition to not nurture nature or a greater emphasis being placed on charity towards human suffering?” I don’t think those are the two right options necessarily. I’m not sure that animals are extinct because we care more about human suffering though we could always care more about animal suffering I suppose…Firstly you have to point out that extinction is part of the natural order. We will become extinct whatever we do, eventually, but having said that, obviously, surely, man has accelerated the extinction of many species –
M: Yeah. That’s the point. Extinction is happening much much faster and nobody can agree on the figures of course, it’s just guesswork, but it’s got to be many many many times faster than it did before we were around and before we started interfering so much with the natural world. It’s an interesting thing though, this question about putting more emphasis on human suffering – I don’t see conservation as just wildlife –
S: No.
M: We’ve already seen in these first few trips it’s so integral with human survival as well
S: Absolutely.
M: The only way to protect a forest is to involve the local human population who rely on the forest as much as the animals do.

(edit)

M: The other part of the question is ‘what’s the big problem’ and it’s – we’re the big problem and I think if you had to put your finger on one thing…I mean there are many different threats to wildlife and the natural world but it has to be habitat destruction

(edit)

M: Well when Douglas and I were here there were ten million people in Madagascar and now there are twenty one million people in Madagascar
S: Exactly.
M: and so you’ve got twice as many people going after the same resources and it’s obviously going to be having a massive impact
S: Absolutely.
M: you can’t deny and the world population is increasing exponentially
S: So the pressure on food, on simply clearing woodlands, and forests, and other precious and rare and difficult environments to manage clearing them for growing food – we all think the children of the world should eat, well of course we think that, of course we think there should be new crops here and ‘oh! Isn’t this exciting here’s a crop that means packaging can no longer made of plastics and can biodegrade because it’s made of soya gum or something’. But of course that’s clearing a huge forest to grow a cash crop which is inimical to all kinds of species and we’re driven crazy by this… but I suppose that’s what the question’s at the heart of, is there a contradiction, is it possible to save human beings from starvation and misery and hunger AND not ruin
M: It is.
S: It is, of course.
M: A lot of the big problem areas are poor areas and it’s all very well that we go in with all our ideas and theories and things that have worked in other countries but it involves a huge amount of money, and a huge amount of time to help people to develop these different ways of living and new ways of managing the land
S: We, Western Europeaners in particular have already ruined our habitat to a certain extent
M: To a great extent.
S: We’ve already got rid of our forests, we’ve got rid of our wolves and our bears and many of our bigger mammals and we have created our own you know island of Europeanness and now we look out at these poorer countries and tell them how to behave. It’s a bit like we also tell China it mustn’t industrialise too fast or makes too much pollution when we have done all that!
M: I agree, we’re incredibly hypocritical. And I think one of the best examples is – there’s this debate about reintroducing wolves to Scotland and yeah everyone’s up in arms, ‘oh wolves are dangerous’ and ‘it’s going to cause this problem with sheep farming’ and blah blah blah and yet we’re at the same time saying to people in Africa ‘well you should be living alongside lions, what’s the problem?’
S: Yes! (laughs)
M: And in India, ‘well why are you so upset about the odd maneating tiger?’
S: Yes!
M: ‘They’re not all maneaters’ and it’s so hypocritical, you have to sometimes sort of pull back and think you know living alongside dangerous animals or whatever the issue is is relevant to them as it would be to us.
S: You’re absolutely right. You can guarantee that the average Briton, especially one with children, if they saw a wolf, they would be on the phone saying ‘the Government should do something about this, there are wolves near my children’ and all their sudden anger at watching ‘oh isn’t it a shame about the way the habitats of the world are destroyed’ would be forgotten, and we have to remember that about ourselves, that although we are capable of astonishing altruism we also fundamentally amazingly selfish.
M: This is why (fades out)

@dreamingshadow

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PamJH


Member

Posted Fri Feb 27th, 2009 2:37pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
Wonderful, MP, and thanks for transcribing.


Stephen's last comment reminded me of a terrible incident that happened one town over. A small black bear was discovered very early in the morning in one of the neighborhoods. Instead of calling a wildlife expert (who told our newspaper later that she kept in regular contact with police authorities in the area, had the proper equipment, facilities, etc.), they shot the poor thing five times. The police kept saying school was to start in a few hours, there were bicycle riders out (at 4 a.m.? Our cops reporter knew what those kids were up to), blah, blah, blah. And more than one of those cops offered to shoot the bear, were even kind of excited about it. It made me sick.

This could have been handled so differently. I still feel terrible when I think about it.

I'm so glad your question was answered. You should be very proud.

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Fryphile


Member *

Posted Fri Feb 27th, 2009 3:23pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
Terrific, MP! Thanks for transcribing it all. Did you feel like Stephen was talking to you directly, each word nesting in your soul?

I think of myself as someone who is filled with love, whose only purpose in life was to achieve love. - Stephen Fry

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monochromeprincess


Member

Posted Fri Feb 27th, 2009 3:47pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
Terrific, MP! Thanks for transcribing it all. Did you feel like Stephen was talking to you directly, each word nesting in your soul?

LOL, you summed it up better than I possibly could have

@dreamingshadow

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monochromeprincess


Member

Posted Fri Feb 27th, 2009 4:12pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
Kakapos and other animals



Kakapos and other animals

M: “How do Stephen and Mark think the situation has changed for the animals that Douglas and Mark went in search of for the original project? I am particularly interested in news of kakapo numbers.”
S: Well we haven’t go to South A…New Zealand yet, I should say
M: (laughs)
S: that’s kakapos – well done Stephen – so we can’t answer that one.
M: Well actually there was a bit of news about kakapos last week while we were in…um…where were we last week?
S: uh…Kurindee? (sp)
M: Kurindee. Apparently one of the kakapos died. So I do know the figures, because I got this note from a friend, but when Douglas and I were in New Zealand there were forty,
S: Yeah?
M: and their numbers went up to a peak of ninety three in April this year
S: Yeah?
M: And since then three have died so
S: So it’s at ninety.
M: Ninety, yes.
S: So it’s still
M: But it’s one of the few animals whose numbers have increased
S: Yep
M: Even thought ninety is a scarily low number…
S: But it’s a good question, isn’t it, from Adrian Camp, you know obviously I can’t answer as well as you but at the bit I would say of it that strikes me is that more is known now
M: Mmhmm.
S: Not that I’m saying that you lived in the Dark Ages when you went to visit but you know both through technology and through the fact that environmental and conservation issues have risen higher and higher on the agenda in people’s consciousness, academics have come, perhaps, in greater numbers, in Madagascar and is true of the other environments we are visiting, there seems to be more data.
M: Yeah, certainly. I mean with Madagascar we knew virtually nothing about the wildlife in Madagascar when Douglas and I came, and almost all of the research has been done in the years since, so we have a much better idea of what’s going on, of what’s here first of all
S: Mmm.
M: And what’s going on, so yeah.
S: And it seems a dull point to make but it’s a truth of all science that until you know the basic facts of anything you’re investigating any solution you suggest is meaningless; if you don’t know how many there are of a species, what kind of food they eat, and much duller things that that – or at least superficially dull – I mean the real everyday detail of how animals and plants interreact, until that is really well charted you can’t begin to save it.
M: The trouble is of course you’re racing against the clock.
S: Mmm.
M: You need to have that information but you need to have it now, because a lot of…well we’re seeing animals on this trip that have only been discovered a few years ago and yet already they’re endangered, so we barely know they exist and have given them a name, let alone know exactly where they live or how many of them there are
S: Yes.
M: And what habitat they need and what food they need and so on and so forth.

@dreamingshadow

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PamJH


Member

Posted Fri Feb 27th, 2009 7:18pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED
Thanks for this, MP.

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AdrianCamp


Member

Posted Thu Jun 27th, 2013 4:25pm Post subject: MY QUESTION GOT ANSWERED

Just had a really weird experience.
Sorry for Necro-posting this thread but I just googled my name and kakapos to find the reply to my question, in order to show someone else and was directed here to your old thread.
Odd to see anyone else talking about it.
Thanks for transcribing it for everyone 'monochromeprincess'.
Kind regards
AC


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