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Fryphile


Member *

Posted Wed Mar 21st, 2007 6:30pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
The Americans stereotypical view of the English is bowtie wearing, Oxford educated, arrogant smug bastards.

But sometimes they're so DAMN SEXEE

I think of myself as someone who is filled with love, whose only purpose in life was to achieve love. - Stephen Fry

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boffinbabe12


Member

Posted Wed Mar 21st, 2007 7:36pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
Agreed.

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Tourmaline


Member

Posted Wed Mar 21st, 2007 8:06pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
This topic has been looked at today by the BBC News website here. Some of the comments made me smile

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Gertrude Susanne


Member

Posted Wed Mar 21st, 2007 8:09pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
This is indeed the 6iest bowtie I have ever seen - and that Stephen attached to it isn´t too bad-looking either (with the hair coloured to match the bowtie, interesting ! I am glad he was not wearing a green one X-D )

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trouser material


Member

Posted Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 7:19am Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
letting the happy jiggery stupid Irish blissfully drown in the lower deks?
not sure i like the stupid bit......

Thats the stereotype i'm talking about, not my opinion.

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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 1:13pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
This topic has been looked at today by the BBC News website here. Some of the comments made me smile

I loved the one beginning with "May I have 12 slices of salami, please?" and the Scouse story best.

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Tourmaline


Member

Posted Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 7:57pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
This topic has been looked at today by the BBC News website here. Some of the comments made me smile

I loved the one beginning with "May I have 12 slices of salami, please?" and the Scouse story best.

It was the incident where someone confused a Leeds accent with the French language that I liked best.

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ysabella


Member

Posted Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 8:30pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
Surprised to see so many sweeping generalities from this forum, though. Americans do get irony really, we just don't congratulate ourselves on getting it.

Oh SNAP!

I would say that typical American humor is less dry, but that doesn't make it dumber. Just...less dry.

One thing that Americans often think is that because we find someone's accent interesting and lovely to listen to, we assume that ours sounds the opposite to their ear: coarse, dull, flat. But it is quite possible for two people from different parts of the world to talk to each other, and each finds the other's accent pleasant to listen to.
I found this when I was living in Europe. I often had pleasant comments on my speaking voice and accent from strangers, and it happened by far the most in the UK.
Also, since I worked all over western Europe, mostly with French colleagues, I found that my accent, which is a simple one and a lot like the movies, was very easy for people to understand - it would be easier for a German to understand my English than my colleague's French-accented English.

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ysabella


Member

Posted Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 8:56pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
Eddie Izzard has some good stuff on movie accents - how Brits are so often bad guys in American movies, and French people have this sort of special dispensation to play strange characters ("'allo, I am Pierre, I have come to make love to your family"). He puts it down to us breaking away from England, and the help we had from Lafayette. Which is a bit thought-provoking.

As an American 'drama geek,' I would say that British theatre is essentially the mother ship to American theater (although in Seattle, a real actor's town, we prefer to spell it 'theatre' actually). Some people who really study theater will study French drama and various forms of storytelling and puppetry from around the world, but there is generally a special place in an American theater-lover's heart for British theatre. It's the heritage, the source. Drama geeks make the pilgrimage to New York, but many make the pilgrimage to England if they can (and not just London, either, although seeing some plays there is usually key).
There are so many marks on American culture that are straight from England - and there's a very good book on that subject. I found it very eye-opening.

My husband is Dutch, but he lived in Canterbury from age 4 to age 8, which made him bilingual and gave him a British accent when he speaks English. He gets a lot of positive comments on his accent. Some people ask him if he's Australian, but that is usually when he wears his Aussie hat. He's been asked whether he's British, or whether he's Canadian (parts of British Columbia do have a vestige of a British accent). But he is kind of a special case. He can confuse Dutch people just as well.

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 9:41pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
I always find it amusing how on cheesy american tv programmes, any 'british' person on it has a badly mimmicked, posh, private school voice. I think it is perfectly shown in The Simpsons when they come to England... just in my experience of Americans they seem to have that stereotype of an Englishman.

I find that stereotype quite tiring. Brit's are always portrayed as posh, emotionally constipated, uptight and if they're not posh then they talk like Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins.

This topic has been looked at today by the BBC News website here. Some of the comments made me smile

I loved the one beginning with "May I have 12 slices of salami, please?" and the Scouse story best.

It was the incident where someone confused a Leeds accent with the French language that I liked best.

I liked the Scouser story best too.

Assuming direct control...

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boffinbabe12


Member

Posted Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 9:44pm Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
find that stereotype quite tiring. Brit's are always portrayed as posh, emotionally constipated, uptight and if they're not posh then they talk like Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins.

I would love to ship a chav couple over to America because after about three years those two chavs would have multiplied by about six and the preconception of the english would be broken forever!!!

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melampus


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 12:21am Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
Excuse me for being a bit slow on the uptake... I have been very busy at work etc etc .

I haven’t seen the Radio Times article (I’m in Australia) but I assume that it is exactly the same as the one published in the US media – right? I re-read that piece and I simply can’t understand what all the fuss is about. Have you seen the articles in the Guardian (online version) about it? I knew the British media have a reputation for nastiness but the Guardian’s vicious personal attacks, dressed up as “comment”, are frankly incredible. (And not what I naively assumed a ‘quality’ outlet like the Guardian would stoop to.)

What is the agenda against Stephen Fry? From what I can see, this is a gentle, self-deprecating muse on the different styles of British and American actors. Yes, it's self-deprecating -- Fry draws attention to his own acting shortcomings; his comment on accent could also be taken as a swipe at his own image as the posh brainiac. How it can be considered an attack on Hugh Laurie or any other luvvie is beyond me. Besides, Laurie affects an AMERICAN accent in “House”. So, why all the drama?

Of course allusions are being made to a Peter Cook/Dudley Moore-style bust-up, but this is just lazy journalism. People seem to have conveniently forgotten that Stephen has published eight books; Hugh one. When Hugh published his novel, did people say he was jealous, and trying to copy Stephen?

Sorry for the rant, but I just had to get this out of my head so I can go concentrate on “Important Things” (like work – yuck). But I am angry that Stephen can’t defend himself – and if he did, you can just imagine the reaction. Yes, media attention is all part and parcel of being a media figure. Yes, people are quoted out of context all the time. But I do feel there is something very weird going on here; especially since the article is such a little thing. Such savagery seems mis-placed. Are the British media all cross and bothered because someone has dared suggest that those dumb-ass colonial American actors are just as talented as Brits? Or is it “cool” to hate Stephen now?


Yes, the BBC's coverage is much more even-handed.

And you should try being an Aussie -- everyone thinks you're a knockabout larrikin, Crocodile Dundee/Steve Irwin sort of person, not too bright but fun. Unfortunately I have never wrestled a crocodile. I don't go to the beach, drink beer, wear thongs (flip-flops) or go to barbies.

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trouser material


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 8:47am Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
That is precisely my thoughts about it melampus, well said.

I'm just a little saddened that you aren't the Aussie stereotype. X-D When i travelled around Australia last year the Aussies were fantastic, much nicer and more articulate than 'the stereotype' would lead you to believe.Perhaps this was naive on my part, but sometimes stereotypes are unaviodable. They're subconscious.

Anyway back to the issue, i'm siding with Fry on this one.

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melampus


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 9:56am Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
Thank you, Trouser. Oh, don't get me wrong, I AM fantastic, much nicer and more articulate than the stereotype! (And I'm gorgeous and sexy too. Devastatingly so.) I just don't walk around with some poor reptile's teeth sticking out of my hat!!!


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Gertrude Susanne


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 11:03am Post subject: Oh Stephen... really??
I wish I could read Mr Fry´s thoughts to learn what he is making of the media attention his statement has aroused. (But I assume if he felt he wanted/needed to defend himself, he could or would... and, yes, "comments" by e.g. TY are appalling )

I just hope he will not get entangled in the cobweb woven by some journalists who apparently interpret other people´s statments consistent with their own sinister mindset. What world those people must be living in …

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