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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 8:18pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
Irony surrenders.

Again, not something I've heard before... I guess I've been pretty lucky, cliche-wise.

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JVONEARTH


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 8:37pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
This is one i have never understood.
When your let's say up a ladder and it's unsteady and you fall off
A person saying

"I knew that was going to happen"

Or " I could see that coming a mile off"

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meekychuppet


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 8:42pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
When I said "irony surrenders" I meant the irony of someone using the phrase "opening a can of worms" when describing an irritating phrase - that's why I quoted them.

Dear god...

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AxmxZ


Moderator

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 8:44pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
When I said "irony surrenders" I meant the irony of someone using the phrase "opening a can of worms" when describing an irritating phrase - that's why I quoted them.

Dear god...

Unless I'm much mistaken, they were giving it as an example and not using it as a description.

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JVONEARTH


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 8:45pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
Oh i see thanks for that

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meekychuppet


Member

Posted Fri Feb 23rd, 2007 8:48pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
When I said "irony surrenders" I meant the irony of someone using the phrase "opening a can of worms" when describing an irritating phrase - that's why I quoted them.

Dear god...

Unless I'm much mistaken, they were giving it as an example and not using it as a description.

In print it seems to make sense both ways.

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joan


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 11:07am Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
The sliced bread saying should be "The worst thing since sliced bread" That sliced white aberrration masquerading as food should be consigned to history along with its 'best thing...' expression. Generations of constipated people have followed that disgusting faux-food's introduction into the unfortunate diet of the English-speaking world. Give me a chunky slice of Australian wholemeal, or a slab of German black bread, or some crispy fresh French bread...anything but sliced white bread.

Anyway, back on old expressions - my Mum used to threaten to wallop me 'into the middle of next week' when I was a particularly obnoxious child. It conjured up some weird pictures in my mind, of hurtling across the rooftops for days and days. Don't know where THAT one came from, but it was in regular use back then in the post WWII years.

Oh yes - that brings back another one - nasty cocky little officials were called 'little Hitlers'. When I lived in Vienna the expression Kleinhitler was used, but the Viennese were surprised that the equivalent expression was used in English.

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Kaseryn


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 12:13pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
Personally.. i love all these old sayings. They all add to the richness of the language and are like time capsules for their former contexts. It's very interesting to note, for example.. the massive amount of nautical jargon in English from our seafaring days. When reading William Goldings 'Fire Down Below' trilogy i found myself doing constant double takes as phrases still in metaphorical use were used in their original sense. Thing is.. there was nothing dated about them. Their metaphorical meaning translated perfectly for their modern use.. as is the case with lots of olduns. They often say in far fewer words something that would take longer. Like loose cannon.

re: 'Attitude' .. a word i really like.. unervalued imho. Not in the sense it mostly seems to get used now of front/aggression whatever.. but in a single word it highlights the importance and subjectivity of ones position/angle relative to something. Instead of simply talking about someones opinion on something, we can talk of their attitude, the direction they come to it. I guess just 'view' is quite similar, but doesn't for me have the same inference of trajectory, of positional realtivity.

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Kaseryn


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 12:17pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
As for the sliced white excuse for bread we get here, agreed it is absolute junk. Has a German flatmate when i was at college who was rightly appalled by it and resorted to baking his own, much to our collective pleasure! Getting knocked into next week is still in use, at least in the east end. I love the phrase.. like getting hit so hard you go forward in time. Little Hitler also, not a dead phrase for officious little er.. hitlers


Is the UK the only place with this crap paper bread? Do they make it in the States/Aus etc?

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joan


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 12:28pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
Oh yes - white sliced is the most popular here in Australia. I admit to judging people adversely by the contents of their supermarket trolly, and plastic-wrapped sliced white is my number one indicator of the person getting it wrong.

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boffinbabe12


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 1:29pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
I admit to judging people adversely by the contents of their supermarket trolly, and plastic-wrapped sliced white is my number one indicator of the person getting it wrong.

I judge people by the newspapers they read, but I think quite a lot of people do that.

Hooray for our prejudices!

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joan


Member

Posted Sat Feb 24th, 2007 1:49pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
The newspaper indicator doesn't work too well here - we have only one national daily (The Australian - the one I read) and only one State daily (The Courier Mail)......well, there IS the microscopic and somewhat right-wing parochial Queensland Times but that doesn't count.

No, here you judge people by whether they CAN read. (only joking....sort of) On the train to work I would look in horror at women who read Mills and Boone books (sloppy love stories), wondering how they could read them in public without feeling shame.

Oh, we are going off subject a bit, aren't we? Back to old and new expressions. During the Hanson era (ie our former racist MP), one journalist came up with a phrase to describe her followers: "They don't like important emotional issues being clouded by facts"

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Sun Feb 25th, 2007 5:05pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
One phrase that I absolutely hate is "Jobs a good 'un and Bob's your uncle." Eurgh eurgh eurgh! I just hate it!

I was watching Eddie Izzard's 'Definate Article' dvd yesterday and he made jokes about some crappy sayings and all I can remember is the one about teaching your grandmother to suck eggs and something about not suffering fools glady. Who suffers fools gladly?

"Many hands make light work" can be cancelled out by "Too many cooks spoil the broth" so it seems a bit redundant to me to say either.

The newspaper indicator doesn't work too well here - we have only one national daily (The Australian - the one I read) and only one State daily (The Courier Mail)......well, there IS the microscopic and somewhat right-wing parochial Queensland Times but that doesn't count.

No, here you judge people by whether they CAN read. (only joking....sort of) On the train to work I would look in horror at women who read Mills and Boone books (sloppy love stories), wondering how they could read them in public without feeling shame.

Oh, we are going off subject a bit, aren't we? Back to old and new expressions. During the Hanson era (ie our former racist MP), one journalist came up with a phrase to describe her followers: "They don't like important emotional issues being clouded by facts"

When I'm travelling most of the people I've seen reading are reading either TV guides(!), women's magazines or newspapers. You do get the occasional person reading a book though. It makes me feel a little sad that so many people choose to read tv guides on their long commutes.

Assuming direct control...

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Me_actually


Member

Posted Sun Feb 25th, 2007 6:16pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
boffinbabe12 spoke : I judge people by the newspapers they read, but I think quite a lot of people do that.

Hooray for our prejudices

boffinbabe i would like to see you judge me . i don't read newspapers at all . i get my news online !
then again i don't pretend to be smart . i am not , but i am not statying ignorant either . i hope to teach myself more as my life goes on .

woops i just realised what i said might be thought of as an attack on boffinbabe12 . it is not ment to be . i just can;t think of any better words to use .

seeing as we are all obviously online can anyone thing of expressions that came form the internet but have become a part opf every day speach ?

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amyl_nitrate


Member

Posted Sun Feb 25th, 2007 7:43pm Post subject: Out of Date Phrases
I read the news online as well. I don't ever buy newspapers. Sometimes I'll read the local paper if someone's bought it and it's left lying around the house. I'll read the Metro sometimes when I'm commuting and I don't feel like reading a book but other than that I don't read newspapers.

Assuming direct control...

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