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moose


Member

Posted Sun May 4th, 2008 1:41pm Post subject: Paperweight
So, i just bought paperweight.

A large portion of the presentations from Trefusis end with "If you have been, you've only yourself to blame" and "If you have been, go back to sleep"

I eventually came up with the theory that the first half of the sentence could be put into context by using the last word.

This works with my second example, but not with the former.

Basically, I want to know: What is it all about? How do i understand it? Is it some crazy English thing (I'm from Australia)?? Was it a popular way of finishing radio shows in the 1980s?? Is Stephen Fry just some sadist who puts such confusing things in to annoy us??

Yeah, any help would be greatly appreciated.

Moose.

ps – I am very intimidated. I was reading through a discussion on the first Trefusis presentation on here before and thought "Smart people on the internet. Who would have guessed??"

pps - Forgive my grammar, spelling etc, it has been a while since I have posted anything in a place that doesn’t use smileys in every post.

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Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Sun May 4th, 2008 2:51pm Post subject: Paperweight
Welcome, moose!

I don't think the last sentences are supposed to make any sense at all. I've always interpreted them as Trefusian idiosyncrasies - the mad babblings of an old man and fuddy-duddy professor, which renders his (quite intelligent) rants all the more intriguing.

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ellenderanged


Member

Posted Mon May 5th, 2008 1:51am Post subject: Paperweight
there is a reading of paperweight (but only on tape - look it up via amazon*) which I dearly recommend - to me, certainly not english mothertongued, the trefusis ends made sense and me giggle.

*if not there's still piracy and stephen will 'ass' you. X-D

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PamJH


Member

Posted Mon Jan 26th, 2009 5:20am Post subject: Paperweight
I received a copy of Paperweight from the Michigan State University library on Friday. I opened it today, dictionary at the ready, and happily perused the titles.

Of course, I first read Don't Knock Masturbation. Turns out it's about television. Then I tried Tatler and Sex in which Mr. Fry tells us there's no reason to engage in that activity. Then I moved on to Saying Fuck (I finally allowed myself to type that word!) which was right to the fornicating point, to say the least.

I then moved on to Sock Fury, which left me vomiting in glee. I read assorted other articles, never mind Mr. Fry's direction to use the book as lavatorial reading, one title per shit. I can only keep the book for two weeks, so unfortunately, I must hurry through it. Perhaps a nasty stomach bug would be willing to assist me here.

I also learned a host (or plethora) of new words, including but not limited to: hebdomal, sesquipdalian, metonym, nugatory and spoffle. I'll let you look these up for yourselves.

In short, this is quite a lovely and enjoyable book, in the lavatory or out.

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Katrina


Member

Posted Mon Jan 26th, 2009 5:48am Post subject: Paperweight
I just got it for Christmas and have been sort of working through it ever since. I feel guilty reading it on the elliptical when I should be reading school stuff, but it's too fun to stop. I literally laughed out loud while reading Trefusis, which no book has made me do in a while. I want to pass it on to my mom next, and I also want the audio books.

My favorite was when Trefusis was in America and got arrested for crack (or was it coke?)!

Open to suggestions as to what my sig should consist of...

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fryfan20


Member

Posted Thu Mar 26th, 2009 5:11am Post subject: Paperweight
I've got it and just read the introduction.
I know it's written in 92 and maybe he has changed since then but it made my wish that I could somehow let him see how wonderful he is. there is so much self-hatred is that the word ? in there.
he deserves to be as kind to himself as he is to others.

I am what I am

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AA


Member

Posted Mon Apr 6th, 2009 12:56pm Post subject: Paperweight
A friend of mine is translating Paperweight into Russian and is confused by this: "so let me say as clearly and boldly as I can that my book is dreadful nonsense, stearine bilge, as the Master would say". I'm not familiar with the exact origin of "stearine bilge" and can only guess that the expression, meaning "a fat load of nonsense", might be a Cambridge (or Oxbridge, for all I know) thing, the Master in question being a college master. It's taken from A Signing of the Times. Any help would be much appreciated.

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