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echo_just


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Posted Tue Nov 1st, 2011 11:46am Post subject: Planet Word - English & French observation

I've just watched the third episode. I really love this programme. I like that English is such a progressive language and that it adapts to new words and phrases created by social popularity.

There is so much of this lacking in the French language which I found difficult when I moved here a few years ago. Being English we can create our own logic to a sentence and people generally know what we mean i.e. 'where do these cups live?' when tidying up the kitchen. Whereas in French if I say 'Ils habitant où ces tasses?' I'm immediately corrected for it is not an acceptable sentence. There is not as much creativity which I find restricting.

Although, maybe it would be acceptable for a native French person to say this but as I am clearly not native, maybe, it is felt that I must be corrected to using the correct 'C'est où on range les tasses?'

What do you think? Any bilingual English/French speakers that can clear this up for me? Is French really as adaptable as English?

Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck. The Dalai Lama

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A-MC


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Posted Thu Nov 3rd, 2011 2:50am Post subject: Planet Word - English & French observation

Now, I find this really interesting. I have to confess up front that I achieved a fairly good level of French speaking at Higher level in Scotland (not sure what the equivalent is in England?)but have never used it since so my knowledge is now completely embarassing. Anyway, my English husband, who is fluent in French and spent several summers working over there, constantly refers to 'where things live'- a phrase I never heard until we got togteher. Is it English? Or is it French as to do with genders that are assigned??


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echo_just


Member

Posted Thu Nov 3rd, 2011 12:55pm Post subject: Planet Word - English & French observation

Hi, I think it's English to ask where things live. I get very funny looks from friends when I ask the same question in French. I'm told that it's not a proper phrase, or rather it shows that I'm not a native speaker.
Thanks for responding

Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck. The Dalai Lama

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