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joewalkernomad


Member

Posted Fri Sep 11th, 2009 10:24am Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

Hello there.
I have joined this forum because I need to find an intelligent person to answer a question about the phrase "resting on your laurels".

I have put the phrase into Google and it only comes up with the meaning and I know the meaning.

I also realise and have understood for quite some time about laurels being given to prominent people or winners of Roman and Greek games, but there are usually certain events or stories that create such phrases.

So I wish to know the actual origin of the phrase (not the meaning) and if anyone knows it will be someone on the website of one of the most knowledgeable people around so it stands to reason the people talking on it must be too.

Thanks a lot.


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michael


Member

Posted Fri Sep 11th, 2009 8:18pm Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

wow you're like the second person today who's said we must be smart.

only new people say that.

just kidding.

anyways...did you find this in your search?
http://www.wordwizard.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=7.....w=previous

there's no "story" but one fella's post did list the years the phrase was first used (published) 1859etc. and below it shows what was said when it was used.

"HELLO I'M TACTILE !" is an anagram of my name

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exoskeleton


Member

Posted Fri Sep 11th, 2009 8:58pm Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

yeah, I don't think it's a story. I checked the online OED (a library service, so I can't link, sorry) and it just seems to have developed gradually as an idiom.

sockdolager.

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tito


Member *

Posted Fri Sep 11th, 2009 9:09pm Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

michael said:
wow you're like the second person today who's said we must be smart.

only new people say that.

just kidding.


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tito


Member *

Posted Fri Sep 11th, 2009 9:12pm Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

I always thought it was something to do with Julius Caesar. Although I may have got this idea from an Asterix the Gaul book.

Which is probably the case.


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Fryphile


Member *

Posted Fri Sep 11th, 2009 10:19pm Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

Ovid tells of how laurels came to be in the story of Apollo and Daphne. Cupid shot Apollo with an arrow of love and pierced Daphne with an arrow that repels love. So Apollo pursued Daphne through the woods, professing his love and whatnot, and Daphne was all "ick, get away, creep!" Or words to that effect. Daphne somehow turned into a tree to escape his salacious pursuit, and Apollo said something about how he would still love her as a tree and adorn her with laurels that would be given out to victorious warriors. So laurels are tokens of great accomplishment.

Or it could be Hardy snogging his mate.

I think of myself as someone who is filled with love, whose only purpose in life was to achieve love. - Stephen Fry

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michael


Member

Posted Fri Sep 11th, 2009 10:35pm Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

i love how in ovid's telling of myths it sounds like the main key to a successful sex life is shapeshifting

wanna get laid? turn into a bear. get caught with someone you shouldn't be with? turn them into a horse. don't like the person hitting on you? turn into a tree.

i wish i could metamorphosize whenever i see a beloved

that stuff's expensive these days.

"HELLO I'M TACTILE !" is an anagram of my name

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michael


Member

Posted Fri Sep 11th, 2009 10:36pm Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

i made up those particular bear/horse/etc all i remember is, it happened a lot.

"HELLO I'M TACTILE !" is an anagram of my name

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joewalkernomad


Member

Posted Thu Sep 17th, 2009 9:13pm Post subject: Resting on your laurels.

Cheers for your help all.
So what it seems is that it is only like saying now you’ve won something (such as laurels) don’t wait around for some clever Git to do better.
and so from what I can ascertain from your links, suggestions and some other research it is basically a shortened over the years version of "don’t rest AFTER achieving laurels as someone may pit you in your field" (or whatever that translates to in Latin) and there is no actual event in history that it is derived from.

As stated by Michael "an idiom".

Thanks again.


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