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katysara


Moderator

Posted Wed Oct 10th, 2007 9:18pm Post subject: Stigma
The main message I took away from Stephen's excellent HIV & Me was that the social stigma this condition causes effects a form of social death that long proceeds the actual one... even nowadays when a normal life span can be expected by those lucky enough to have, and be suitable for, medication.

To my knowledge I have never met anyone with HIV or AIDS. That may well be because the problem was hidden. I would like to believe I would not react badly to such news. I make no judgments about people with HIV just as I would hope others would not judge me for being bipolar (but they do, and we all know it).

I really think that Stephen's work with The Secret Life, and now HIV & Me will hammer stigma over the head, and the world can only be a better place for it.

My love to any and all with HIV, I wish you were not so scared, but I understand why you are.

Katy Sara x

I am an administrator on this site.

"Having a great intellect is no path to being happy."
~ Stephen Fry

See my website: www.katysaraculling.com

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katysara


Moderator

Posted Sat Oct 13th, 2007 2:21pm Post subject: Stigma
Another forum member reminded me about something. It is not just stigma that is the problem, but there is also a FEAR of stigma. This is just as debilitating as actual stigma.

Any ideas of ways to battle stigma? (Or fear of stigma). Maybe write on this forum that you do not stigmatize people with HIV, and everyone who reads this will know they can be that little bit less afraid.

Come on!!!

KSx

I am an administrator on this site.

"Having a great intellect is no path to being happy."
~ Stephen Fry

See my website: www.katysaraculling.com

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Sat Oct 13th, 2007 6:25pm Post subject: Stigma
i definately don't feel strange about people with hiv. i remember a time i was talking to a sweet funny guy at the thrift store, and he mentioned he had aids and thought it had affected his brain. i said, "oh god i'm sorry..." and he interrupted me with a quick "oh, it's fine hon- " and went on with his story! it surprised me, and made me feel sad. but what was a surprise for me was a thing that he lives with everyday, so he had a completely different perspective. sometimes we treat people with a terminal illness differently from others without really realizing it... if it's out of our "comfort zone"... he seemed to understand that and know how to deal with it!

i was very surprised at the stories of abuse in the documentary. i always thought of the uk as very progressive compared to rural america (where i grew up.) i know that's probably a silly assumption, since britain is a big place of different regions and so on. i assume the city i live in now is progressive and a good place to be if you are hiv+, but seeing the doc made me realize that there may be a lot of mistreatment i don't see. the more people hide from fear, the less we know about what they suffer.

if anyone has good suggestions for organizations to support or things to do to help the hiv+ people in our community, it would be great to have a list.

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katysara


Moderator

Posted Sat Oct 13th, 2007 8:43pm Post subject: Stigma
I certainly haven't encountered any abuse towards people with HIV in the parts of England where I have lived. I don't think it's as bad everywhere - but I could be wrong. I've never witnessed any anti-HIV behaviour.

I don't think of HIV as being a terminal illness these days, with meds a normal lifespan can be had. Not that I mean it isn't a serious diagnosis with considerable problems.

KSx

I am an administrator on this site.

"Having a great intellect is no path to being happy."
~ Stephen Fry

See my website: www.katysaraculling.com

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Sun Oct 14th, 2007 4:30am Post subject: Stigma


I don't think of HIV as being a terminal illness these days, with meds a normal lifespan can be had. Not that I mean it isn't a serious diagnosis with considerable problems.

KSx

sorry... i probably need to look up what "terminal" means... as opposed to chronic or serious! mah bad. :-//

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seasun545


Member

Posted Sun Oct 14th, 2007 9:48am Post subject: Stigma
I saw the second part of the documentary yesterday and I also got shocked that people didn´t want to be filmed cause they were afraid of the stigma and the fear of it for family and friends. I found specially touching that grandparent that didn´t want to show his face cause he was worried about his grandsons.
Also very shocked to know that people with HIV have had childs without HIV, no idea that was possible. Science is incredible, that really gives hope, I felt completely astonished and amazed, it was really mooving.

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katysara


Moderator

Posted Sun Oct 14th, 2007 3:22pm Post subject: Stigma
sorry... i probably need to look up what "terminal" means... as opposed to chronic or serious! mah bad. :-//

Terminal means it will definitely kill you, as in you have so many days, weeks, or months to live. :'( Chronic means a long lasting, possibly permanent illness - it might be terminal but it might not. Serious means that it is extremely high risk of death or harm coming to the person, but death is by no means certain. None are particularly cheery.

Yeah Seasun I agree about the miracles of science - washing sperm, who would have thought it?!?

KSx

I am an administrator on this site.

"Having a great intellect is no path to being happy."
~ Stephen Fry

See my website: www.katysaraculling.com

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Darenmarc


Member

Posted Thu Mar 12th, 2009 10:31am Post subject: Stigma
Hi Folks - I am a newbie to the site and this topic has interested me!

I live with HIV and I have to say that stigma has not really raised it's ugly head in my case (yet!) I find that tackling peoples preconceptions head-on and being honest about my status is not only disarming but educational to those who have never met anyone with HIV before.

I am open about my status with friends and family as well as my colleagues at work. Whilst some have been quite wary (mild stigma I guess!) most have been very open to discussions on the condition. So much so my openness has even got quite a few people who have never been tested to take the plunge and confirm their own status!

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