Topic RSS | Reply to topic
Author Post

blancanieves


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 2:55pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
Hello Mr Fry and others who are Bi-polar.

I've just seen this week Mr. Fry's documentary about Bi-polar disorder. Congratulations to both you and BBC2. I think it was clear ,informative, and sensitive and yet not overdramatic.

For years I've suspected that a relative of mine has this problem, although not so extreme He isn't fond of doctors or medication, so he really isn't getting treatment except for depression , which coincides during winter and gets manic again in spring-summer. Not really solving the problem, is it?

My point is, I wish he and others would accept this as a problem with a solution and accept to be diagnosed and treated. Many illnesses can't be treated or cured ,so I think these people needlessly hurt themselves and others around them. How would you feel if someone you loved had a very dangerous high blood pressure and they refused to take medication or change thier diet and lifestyle in any possible way?

Please Mr. Fry and others, do accept to be diagnosed and find the right type and amount of medication that suits you. Not all heart conditions get the same type or amount of medication. Some need a little and others a lot. I don't think having medication will make you zombies just because you aren't in a manic period.

Do "healthy" people missout on manic periods? I don't think so; I think we have them in shorter periods of time. During a few hours at a party, or over a few days ( 2-3 when you're working against a deadline or on a project you're enthusiastic about).

Please take care of yourself Mr. Fry

Back to top

Crazy_in_a_box


Member

Posted Fri Mar 23rd, 2007 10:13pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
Please Mr. Fry and others, do accept to be diagnosed and find the right type and amount of medication that suits you. Not all heart conditions get the same type or amount of medication. Some need a little and others a lot. I don't think having medication will make you zombies just because you aren't in a manic period.

Hi blancanieves,

I am taking it that you do not have D/MD but are going by an outsider who has an interest in the well being of those close to them suffering from it?
Unfortunatly, its not as simple as an equation of Prolem + Medication = Normality. Medication has its own side effects on the body that often make life very difficult for the (want of a better word) sufferer. Some medication takes all your energy, some make you feel sick, some make you ache, some make you have terrible headaches... the list goes on. But the worst side effect is the zombie effect.
The medication I was on cut off all my emotions. I literally could not cry when I needed to, could not laugh whole heartedly (I often had to pretend in certain company) I couldnt feel anything. I was numb. I felt so out of touch with everything, I was willing to go back to the pain and shit of depression rather than feel nothing.
I just want to make it clear, Im glad I went on the medication at the time I did. It stopped my downward spiral, but it also stopped me regaining my feet. I was stuck in limbo as it were. It was only after I got off the meds that I started to take control of things. I took myself off them, my doctor wanted me to stay on them as long as possible, maybe indefinatly. I wasnt prepared to live my life like that.

The only real problem I have with what you said above is the impression that D/MD is like a heart condition, once you find the right meds you wont feel crap or like a zombie. Its not that easy. when taking medication it takes4-6 weeks to feel any effect from them. during that time you can have really bad side effects. coming off them, you are suposed to wean yourself off them, again another few weeks of side effects. you cant stop and start meds like Lithium (as shown in the documentry) as they make you worse. yet you dont know if they will work until you are on them... Then there is the mental side effects that take their toll - why is it I have to rely on pills to not harm myself? what if this is harming my body (the chemicals and such)?
All in all its a big step to go on medication.
I understand and am delighted that you mean well, I think it is fantastic that you have such a heart and understanding. I just dont think its as easy as you make it out to be.
Sarah x

Back to top

becc


Member

Posted Mon Mar 26th, 2007 12:26pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
No offence, but unfortunately I think people being patronising to me and telling me that coming off medication is a bad idea is usually waht makes me decide to try and come off it again.

I have accepted that sometimes it's best to stay on it. BUT, sometimes it's best to come off. I have had more scary side effects with medication being too high than I have had with being 'normal' and just miserably depressed.

And it's not as simple as keeping it at the same level either. Sometimes the dose that has been good for you for so many months can suddenly rocket into being very, very bad.

Or, that might just be me. I've been on 4 different SSRIs now, and have insisted that my GP refers me to a psychiatriat at last, as I'm pretty sure that the fact I've been feeling ups and downs since approximately 1992, but been on and off medication since 2000 isn't A Good Sign. As such.

Although, having said that, I'm currently in quite a hypomanic phase, and it's wonderfully creative...

Back to top

becc


Member

Posted Mon Mar 26th, 2007 12:32pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
By the way, I wondered if Mr Fry would be so kind as to review the children's picture book I am currently writing?

It's only 32 pages long, some of which are only pictures, so it wouldn't be time-consuming...

What's the use of a book without pictures or conversation?

Back to top

Fourth Feline


Member

Posted Thu Mar 29th, 2007 3:23pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
Dear biancanieves,

As a Bi-Polar II sufferer who used to go into denial and kept coming off medications, I think you have hit the nail right on the head. Whilst I respect an individual's right to a differing opinion, I got nowhere till I agreed to accept the diagnosis and start experimenting with the range of medications available.

It is sometimes a long and painful experiment ( I am still trying to get it right after years ! ) - but that is because we each react very differently to what is often the same brand of medication. Some of us get almost complete cures, some of us get little progress and some (like me ) lay somewhere in the middle right now.

That is not because the taking of medication as such is pointless, it is because variables exist. Your comparison to the need, range and efficacy of heart drugs is a valid one in my book. It is however predictable that ( as depressives ) we will attach a more emotive component to our own illness.

In short, I started to make no progress till I started to at least try the medication(s) recommended and be willing to accept as a mature adult that the magic cure does not come overnight.

The fact that Bi-Polar is basically incurable, does not mean that one's quality of life and impact on friends and family cannot be greatly improved.

I was only sad that the documentary did not show the wide range of treatment options and drugs Stephen could have chosen from. Then they could have shown how combinations of drugs/treatments could have been be tried.

Psychiatric drugs can have very bad side effects, but then there are others to try. I ditched a whole class of anti-depressants for a different type and lost my side effects within a few weeks. ( I ditched SSRI types for a RIMA type).


Also ( for example) taking Litihum made me very ill, but a modern alternative 'Depakote' did the same job without too many ill effects - which were themselves reduced by experimenting to find the optimum/minimum effective dose. Now I perceive no side effects.

Unfortunately (and to give a balanced view ) - I have developed aggitated states which require an anti-psychotic. This induces a sleepy, weak and "zombie" like state at higher doses, so the need to experiment continues. I shall have to try threshold doses, timing of doses, and if needed - just get on with it till those states pass.

Take the drugs, and if they don't work - try something else. Be open and willing to explore.

Warm Regards,

Derek.

Back to top

becc


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 12:27pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
Further to my recent post, I have this week seen a psychiatric consultant who thinks that I probably suffer from bipolar III. Which means the SSRIs which I've been trying, coming, off, going back on, changing specific medication, changing doses for nearly 7 years now, have actually been causing some of the problems.

Therefore, I would agree that it's absolutely vital to try and find the right medication for you.

I am now coming off escitalopram and have been referred to a psychiatrist for a more thorough assessment.

Back to top

Fourth Feline


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 1:55pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
Further to my recent post, I have this week seen a psychiatric consultant who thinks that I probably suffer from bipolar III. Which means the SSRIs which I've been trying, coming, off, going back on, changing specific medication, changing doses for nearly 7 years now, have actually been causing some of the problems.

Therefore, I would agree that it's absolutely vital to try and find the right medication for you.

I am now coming off escitalopram and have been referred to a psychiatrist for a more thorough assessment.

That scenario sounds very familiar to me becc: - what once worked can stop working and what an 'appropriate' dose is can change - or the prescription needing to change as does the ever evolving diagnosis. More distressingly, some medications actually made me several times worse !

I am glad you have been at last offered a thorough ( and long overdue) assessment becc.

By the way, what is BP III ?

Warm regards,

Derek.

Back to top

becc


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 3:51pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
It's like bipolar II except that the hypomanic / agitated symptoms are caused mainly by the wrong antidepressents.

It basically means I've been being prescribed the wrong drugs for years, even though I pointed out to the doctor on several occasions that I felt a bit manic, family and friends thought I was behaving oddly and that I looked as if I met all the criteria for cyclothymia.

Unfortunately, I think my depression gets too bad for it to be cyclothymia, and I do actually have some relatively normal times for a few months where I'm not too depressed or hyper.

Back to top

Fourth Feline


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 4:47pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
Thanks for that info becc. It is always good to be abreast of others people's experience in understanding our common ground.

Your reply reminded me of a post/reply by miss seaneen, who recommended a forum member to consider Paroxitine as being possibly the only non-activating SSRI.

I certainly had to withdraw from the mood stabiliser Carbomazepine because of aggitating side effects and to a lesser degree Lamotrigine for the same reason.

I now take Depakote for the mood stabilising and Moclobemide for the depression. I am still having to experiment with varying nightime doses of Seroquel for the aggitation and as a sleeping pill/ to augment the anti-depressant, but even Moclobemide (being fairly 'activating' ) - may have to be swapped at some point.

Derek.

Back to top

Nothing


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 9:24pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
[b]Tell you what...I had problems from when I was a young teenager. Never quite the same as my friends...always thought more deeply, yet appeared more confident and outrageous! All through my life, I battled with the decisions that were periodically made for me by my parents and also with the peer pressure as I grew up. Apparently, you're not strong if you have to use medication...pull yourself together and do what everybody else has to do...just get on with it!! Well, I did do that...for years and years and years!! It was only recently, after having three failed relationships and three lovely kids that I, finally, decided that I knew my own body AND my own mind (yes, it took that long) and shouted from the rooftops that I couldn't fecking help it!!!!! There was something in me that just kept turning me inside out and round and round whenever it felt like it! I am now, after a few hiccups on Fluvoxamine every day and Haloperidol when my mood sends me off the planet and into another world!!! This regime of medication still means I am the same madcap and zany person that everybody knows and loves. However, it stops the pain...and by pain I mean the desperation felt when I 'flip' and lose my head. I am so much more tolerable by people around me and I have a far better life because of it. I got me a lovely man and he's still here and happy! I'm still loud and proud though!! NOT a zombee and NOT a doormat for anyone!! Just not in pain anymore. Still get the odd...scream my head off and want to eat my own pets...type days too though. Guess you can't have everything eh?[/b]

I know my triggers and avoid them at all costs,
but sometimes the gun just goes off in my face!

Back to top

meekychuppet


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 9:27pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
Why are you posting in bold text?

Back to top

Nothing


Member

Posted Fri Mar 30th, 2007 10:25pm Post subject: Taking medication when needed
...'cos it's an option and it's there? Just like italics? Just like underline?Just like all the other lovely colours you can use?[/ Anyway, gotta go and express my moods elsewhere :-> PROMISE NEVER TO DO IT AGAIN...hehe

I know my triggers and avoid them at all costs,
but sometimes the gun just goes off in my face!

Back to top