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Norfolkian


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Posted Sun May 20th, 2007 2:52pm Post subject: the star's tennis balls
I found this book horribly depressing. I adored all his other novels but I felt with this one there wasn't one single character with any redeeming qualities whatsover. By the end it just feels hopeless. I found that strange when his other novels always offered hope/redemption at the end. I wondered how depressed Stephen was feeling when he wrote it! In fact, I felt so strongly about it that when I met Stephen at a book signing for this novel I had a go at him - doh! Now I just wish I had kissed his feet instead.

The Stars' Tennis Balls is my favourite of Stephen's novels - it's so powerfully written and I guess I like reading depressing and twisted stuff sometimes (what does that say about me?!). I've read it twice and found it just as compelling both times. Actually, come to think of it, many of my favourite novels have tragic endings...

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zelanne


Member

Posted Sun Jun 24th, 2007 11:15am Post subject: the star's tennis balls
This is the second book of Stephen Fry's that I purchased last year (the first one is The Incomplete and Utter History of Music). I must admit, I actually found out about it from Wikipedia, so I was prepared for the parallelism and--even though the Count of Monte Cristo also ended depressingly--the ending of Stars' Tennis Balls really got to me.

I did enjoy the part where Simon came across the internet for the very first time. And the dedication to "m'colleague" was very touching.

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girlracer


Member

Posted Tue Jul 24th, 2007 12:01pm Post subject: the star's tennis balls
I said pretty much what I said above, that I felt quite angry that he'd left the reader with no hope. I can't remember exactly what he said - it was all a blur and I was focussed on just trying to remember to breathe - but I think it was along the lines of him laughing and saying he'd try and make the next one have a happier ending. (While secretly questioning why they let these lunatics in no doubt).

I loved the book too, didn't really think about the dark ending as in contrast to the start, just that it was shocking and clever. But with ref to the quote above, I saw Stephen going into Dixons on Oxford Street (I was heading there anyway) so I went in behind him, took a peek from behind some shelves and decided it was ok to say hello! Was so pleased I did because he couldn't have been more gracious, but I suspect he was thinking along the lines of 'secretly questioning why they let these lunatics in' (did you see it in his face, brightondebs?!!)

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holdthenewsreadersnose


Member

Posted Fri Jul 27th, 2007 1:10am Post subject: the star's tennis balls
I read this a couple of years ago, borrowed from the library when I was skint, and have finally got round to buying it today. A fantastic book, regardless of its debt to "...Monte Christo" - highly amusing, yet thrillingly dark in places, too.

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Anonymous


Unregistered

Posted Sun Jan 13th, 2008 1:01pm Post subject: the star's tennis balls
Just finished reading it last night, it was brilliant. Got to be my favourite of SF's books.

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