Topic RSS | Reply to topic
Author Post

Shader


Member

Posted Fri Oct 24th, 2008 1:26am Post subject: Worst Cooked Turkey I Have Ever Seen!!
My mother always smothers salad with mayo and it's horrible.

That sounds kind of gross. It's a bit thick to be a salad topping but it's, uh, interesting.

Back to top

Soupy Twist


Member

Posted Fri Oct 24th, 2008 8:37am Post subject: Worst Cooked Turkey I Have Ever Seen!!
Just out of curiosity, how long does it take to fry a turkey?

As for me, I hate mayonnaise and think it shouldn't be anywhere near salad, though a lot of people do add it to potato salad for instance.

Back to top

TobiasMonk


Moderator

Posted Fri Oct 24th, 2008 11:23pm Post subject: Worst Cooked Turkey I Have Ever Seen!!
Just out of curiosity, how long does it take to fry a turkey?

As for me, I hate mayonnaise and think it shouldn't be anywhere near salad, though a lot of people do add it to potato salad for instance.

It's a little under 1 hour for a 20lb. turkey.

I cannot be awake for nothing looks to me as it did before, Or else I am awake for the first time, and all before has been a mean sleep.
Walt Whitman

Back to top

Bishop of Attleborough


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 7:46am Post subject: Worst Cooked Turkey I Have Ever Seen!!
Interesting name, have you ever lived in the town in MA?
I've never so much as visited Massachusetts, alas. In ABoF&L's take-off on the Judas Priest trial, involving the "light metal" duo The Bishop and The Warlord, it emerges that the aforementioned "Bishop" is in fact the Bishop of Attleborough, though I suspect the Attleborough in question is in the one in Norfolk, not the one in Massachusetts. (Given that the majority of Puritan settlers to New England came from East Anglia, I'd wager that Attleboro[ugh], MA was named after Attleborough in Norfolk, though.)

When you say mayo do you mean it had ranch dressing on it? Because I've never heard of mayonnaise alone being used on salad and it seems strange that it would come that way.
Yeah, mayonnaise as salad dressing is practically unheard of in the US. Unless you're having dinner with Russian immigrants, because it's standard practice in Russia.

On a more general (and on-topic) note, you don't have to be American to overdo the deep frying. If you spend any length of time in the Netherlands, you might be forgiven for thinking the Dutch approach to cuisine is "when in doubt, batter, bread and deep-fry it." That includes "localizing" other cuisines; Indonesian-style fried rice, Italian-style pasta, you'll find them molded into something the shape and size of a hockey puck, breaded, deep fried and served in office cafeterias and snack bars. Long before I ever encountered the McRib, I saw the same thing sold in the Netherlands (sans bun) as a "Mexicano." What was supposed to be Mexican about it, I have no idea!

"Sergeant Colon had had a broad education. He’d been to the School of My Dad Always Said, the College of It Stands to Reason, and was now a post-graduate student at the University of What Some Bloke In the Pub Told Me." - Terry Pratchett, Jingo

Back to top

Mares


Member

Posted Thu Oct 30th, 2008 1:43pm Post subject: Worst Cooked Turkey I Have Ever Seen!!
Interesting name, have you ever lived in the town in MA?
I've never so much as visited Massachusetts, alas. In ABoF&L's take-off on the Judas Priest trial, involving the "light metal" duo The Bishop and The Warlord, it emerges that the aforementioned "Bishop" is in fact the Bishop of Attleborough, though I suspect the Attleborough in question is in the one in Norfolk, not the one in Massachusetts. (Given that the majority of Puritan settlers to New England came from East Anglia, I'd wager that Attleboro[ugh], MA was named after Attleborough in Norfolk, though.)

When you say mayo do you mean it had ranch dressing on it? Because I've never heard of mayonnaise alone being used on salad and it seems strange that it would come that way.
Yeah, mayonnaise as salad dressing is practically unheard of in the US. Unless you're having dinner with Russian immigrants, because it's standard practice in Russia.

On a more general (and on-topic) note, you don't have to be American to overdo the deep frying. If you spend any length of time in the Netherlands, you might be forgiven for thinking the Dutch approach to cuisine is "when in doubt, batter, bread and deep-fry it." That includes "localizing" other cuisines; Indonesian-style fried rice, Italian-style pasta, you'll find them molded into something the shape and size of a hockey puck, breaded, deep fried and served in office cafeterias and snack bars. Long before I ever encountered the McRib, I saw the same thing sold in the Netherlands (sans bun) as a "Mexicano." What was supposed to be Mexican about it, I have no idea!

That's interesting. I'm familiar with the fact that many cities and towns in New England, as well as some in the midwest and south, being named after cities and towns in England, but had never heard that there was an Attleborough in England. I have friends who live in Attleboro, and North Attleborough, MA. I lived in Dorchester, MA from birth 'til the age of 5, but there are also Dorchesters in Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Texas, Wisconsin, Maryland and South Carolina.

I'd forgotten about the McRib.. that was ghastly.

I know we get a regular pasting about fried food, but while we do have our share of fried foods that we're associated with, they aren't eaten every day, or every week. I'm sure it's much the same with British fish and chips, etc...

Back to top