App Interview Frackulous

  • Category: iPhone iPad apps
    Language: English
    Duration: 3:36
    Format: Video
    Release date: Fri Oct 22nd, 2010 11:35am

    Description:

    Frackulous interview about all things apps at the Windows Phone 7 launch in London.

  • Rate this: 1 star2 star3 star4 star5 star

One comment on “App Interview Frackulous”

  1. Dear Stephen,
    This is completely unrelated to the post, but I see I’m not the only visitor who does this. I apologise if it drives you quietly mad.

    I want to thank you for The Fry Chronicles (which, having devoured at a sitting, I am now dipping back into every chance I get to savour particular passages) and assure you, if you still need assurance, that you are not alone in your feelings in the area of body image and self-assurance. It might seem hard for some to reconcile your feelings of loathing for your own body with those moodily lit shots of you in the cable knit sweater looking prodromically somewhat like the incipient Robert Pattinson, but I understand. I felt the same about the way I looked when younger, and still do now.

    I also wanted to say that I watched “Peter’s Friends” with my wife recently, and found it beautiful and funny and moving, and the song around the piano particularly made me well up. Now I know you took no vocal part in that, for reasons you’ve gone into in the book, but I wanted you to know particularly that, even with Hugh’s piano work and the others’ soaring vocals, what makes it *perfect*, what sets the seal on it and keeps me coming back to the Youtube clip, is your presence, and especially the little “tying-it-up-in-a-bow” gesture with which you accompany the final note. You may have good and sufficient reasons to feel unable to sing musically, but you have your own way of “singing,” and you do it magnificently.

    Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Join CLUBFRY and make friends

Most Recent Audio

OSCAR WILDE'S SHORT STORIES

OSCAR WILDE'S SHORT STORIES

Oscar Wilde's Fairy Tales continue to exert the same pull over the imagination and emotions as they did when he first read them to his children in the 1880s.